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Number 9... Number 9...


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So beautiful... and so easy to play. Redwood veneer ends, Carroll Standard layout.

Congratulations Roy! It's really a beauty and I like your photo-story: the arrival... the unpacking... the first look and touching this beauty.. I can almost feel your excitement of those moments.

 

I hope you enjoy your Carrol for a least the next 80 years!

Edited by Henk van Aalten
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I suppose, according to that defintion, all concertina players become concertinists sooner or later. Something happens and Colin or Rich or (insert preferred repairer here) is just nowhere to be seen, you have to open it up or not play. Then you find that it doesn't actually explode in a fountain of springs and reeds, so you feel a litle more confident about opening it up next time.

 

Sure is mighdy purdy (as we don't say in these parts), I have to say.

 

Chris

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I would not have dreamt of taking the thing to bits to "have a look"

Oh, don't get me wrong, I was terrified doing it at first. But Wally drove home the point to someone last year that you should be comfortable taking it apart. He had them take reeds out and everything.

 

Interesting. I didn't know anybody was making "real" concertina reeds in the USA. Is anybody else?

As far as I know, Wally is the only one.

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Is this the difference between people who play the concertina and concertinists?  I would not have dreamt of taking the thing to bits to "have a look" I suppose a concertinist is interested in the whole thing.

 

Does look great though!

 

Derek

 

I, on the other hand, got the impression that opening your concertina up just to take a look inside was almost compulsory. Perhaps because my first contact with other concertina players was with the likes of Don Nichols (via the internet) and our very own Jim, who seem very conmfortable with the concept of concertina innards! And perhaps because the first concertina I owned (a Scholer type) had had one reed plate put in back-to-front so it wouldn't play properly until I'd fixed it (in a moving car, on the way home just after I'd bought it :o !).

Samantha

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So beautiful... and so easy to play. Redwood veneer ends, Carroll Standard layout.

Roy,

 

Thanks for sharing the excitement and the photo's. What a wonderfull looking instrument. That case looks really usefull too, with its side compartment. Is that a "Greg Special"?

 

I'm getting excited for #15 all over again now.

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That case looks really usefull too, with its side compartment. Is that a "Greg Special"?

 

Yeah, Wally had a case like that, and I liked it so much I made Greg make me one. I'm not sure how much extra it might cost. I'm sure Greg could tell you. It's big enough for me to fit my minidisc recorder and mic.

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Interesting. I didn't know anybody was making "real" concertina reeds in the USA. Is anybody else?

Yes, Dana Johnson is making his "Kensington" concertinas with reel concertina reeds in Kensington, Maryland.

 

Does he use a jig to make them?

Sorry.

Be more specific Jim: a slip jig or a double.. :unsure: :unsure: :lol:

To be serious (and very off topic): it's about this strange English language:

Michael Reid reads about reeds sounds the same as Michael Read reeds about reids and Michael Reed reids about reads :o

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