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Chamois replacement


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Hello All,

I have embarked on replacing the chamois gasketing on a Lachenal duet. It was damaged in areas, and the bellows to end flat surfaces were completely compressed beyond any fluffing up. Would be interested to hear any advice from anyone who has done this, particularly the best glue to use - presumably one that does not soak into the chamois?

Dave

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don't forget that the end wrap on the bellows frame laps over the the chamois on the bellows frame 'end' where it seals against the pad board. this is only by a mm or so, but cosmetically it makes one hell of a difference.

 

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I would either use Titebond or Zucchini extra chiaro. The latter is a solvent glue that does not penetrate materials and sticks best to itself, so can be completely removed by reactivating it with a fresh coat of itself and lifting it up with a stick covered with a dried coat of even more of the same glue. I use it for pads, bushings and valves. 

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Modern synthetic adhesive is not a good idea in this application.  There will be old glue adhering to the wood, probably hide glue, pva and the like don’t stick well to this, and at the same time are difficult to remove in future when it’s time for the next replacement.  Mush better to use fish glue, liquid hide glue or even starch paste,  all of which clean up with a damp cloth, even when dry, will stick well where traces of old glue remain, and are easily reversible.  
 

Remember you are doing antique restoration here, but just new building.

 

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Many thanks All for such great advice. The fish glue/liquid hide makes much sense, with its reversible nature. Thanks also Dave for the tip about the overlap. I have tried to clean the leather overlap, and keep it undamaged to cope with just this problem. I have done this before a couple of times, but not for over 30 years, so I'm back to being a beginner!

Dave.

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If I'm removing old chamois to replace with new, I always clean off any old glue so that I'm glueing directly to wood.  In some cases, this has meant re-fixing the triangular reed-pan support blocks so that the height matches.  I've never had a problem cleaning up either the PVA or Titebond (which sets brittle and can chip off easily) but I'll happily give fish glue a try.

 

I like animal glues in general, but I'll give Gorilla glue a miss...

 

Alex West

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On 1/13/2023 at 5:34 PM, Alex West said:

If I'm removing old chamois to replace with new, I always clean off any old glue so that I'm glueing directly to wood.  In some cases, this has meant re-fixing the triangular reed-pan support blocks so that the height matches.  I've never had a problem cleaning up either the PVA or Titebond (which sets brittle and can chip off easily) but I'll happily give fish glue a try.

 

I like animal glues in general, but I'll give Gorilla glue a miss...

 

Alex West

Hello Alex,

I suppose you mean the "ordinary" white yellowish titebond which I use for building guitars and mandolins(?). Or did you mean the cold titeboond hide glue you once mentioned?

Thanks, Marien  

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