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How to add a chord to this piece


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I have to say that I commend you on knowing how to read the tablature you submitted ( rainstirmmmm).

That looks daunting to me as someone who can read some music, even at a basic level! Looks like computer code!

Best wishes with your progress anyhow; get practicing and try things out from playing your instrument.. and when you are confident enough; submit your attempts on this site.. 🌝🌝

 

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1 hour ago, Jody Kruskal said:

Yes, please describe the details of your tablature system. I can't even guess what those number mean.

 

Nice tune though. I've been playing along with this youtube and I'm having fun.

 

It looks like it might be Jianpu notation, modified to look a little like Gary Coover's notation, but without the actual staff...

 

Edit: Oh! I just saw the modified tablature posted a few minutes ago. The numbers have changed, but It still looks like Jianpu might have been the start point. The geography is right...

Edited by lachenal74693
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When I firs started to learn to play I used a very simple tablature system which named each note, or button to be used, with a number .. for example on my one.. button number 3 is the C or natural middle C note. (Third button middle row left side on my 30 key Anglo)..

That number 3 is placed immediately next to that particular note ( etc)..

And numbering can be placed alongside the actual manuscript; a number below staff is for left side, and number placed above is for right hand side of instrument.

It looks similar to your tablature, with the difference being it is usually put next to the music notes so aiding learning as you actually play the music.  In the same way you can also just use the numbers alone to play a tune ( without really referring to the music notes).. but it does promote the dual skill of learning both quite nicely.

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For a simple harmony, try adding the note to the left (example button 2 with button 3) with the first and third note in each bar (group). See if you like the effect.

Then maybe learn the tune on the right hand (start: pull 7, 9, push 8,7...)

Then come back for left hand chords -2 or 3 chords will be enough.

I agree it is useful to use the staff notation for your tune and your keyboard layout to add button numbers

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Typically you'll want the melody mostly on the right hand for harmonic-style pieces. There are exceptions, but an entirely left hand melody limits your options for harmony.

 

It's definitely worthwhile to learn the basics of staff notation and music theory. If you search YouTube, there are loads of half hour videos that introduce both.

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The good thing about Anglo system is [very loosely speaking] you press two button together at the same time, you will get two harmonising notes [ thirds] like eg: Button 3 middle row left side and Button 4 left side press in, at same time., and you will get C and E.  It's a lot more complex than that in the long term but demonstrates how simply a very basic chord is already possible using that system. [ with only two buttons and couple of fingers.

Now get on and practice and use your right hand more [ you can create the simple thirds there  with your right hand fingers too [ with just an exception to this as crossing over from left to right side.]

Carry on practicing and do not be put off by mistakes or maybe seemingly taking longer than you would ideally like to progress. Best of luck.

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On 10/30/2022 at 11:12 AM, Jody Kruskal said:

I can't even guess what those number mean.

The score is in Jianpu(literally means "Simple Score,") a kind of moveable-Do tablature. The numbers 1 to 7 in that meaning the tonic to the leading note of a major scale, or Do Re Mi to Ti. For this kind of tablature, you can't tell the key from notes, but it is defined at the beginning, and it also only shows tunes in major keys, for all the minor tunes, it just define as the related major. Back to the score in this thread, it's a Dm tune, and it defined as 1=F. Or should say "6=D," but that's not a standard.

 

Jianpu is only used in China, Japan, and maybe Korea and Vietnam, and it almost only use for traditional musics and instruments. It also used for the basic level recording of other kinds of music nowadays. Jianpu can be considered a modernization of East Asian old tablature "Gongche." Here's a sample of Gongche, the tune is Shepherd's Hey: "工凡六工凡凡, 工凡六工尺, 工凡六工凡, 工凡六合上." You can read it here if you are interested.

 

The Chinese traditional music usually focusing on the solo melodies more but not accompanying, that's why the Jianpu works here. But when the work goes complicated, its readability will goes down.  I've seen someone use Jianpu to write some BWV works down, you can imagine how it looks like......

Edited by Yuxin Ding
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3 hours ago, Yuxin Ding said:

.[1] ..it also only shows tunes in major keys, for all the minor tunes, it just define as the related major...

Thank you for that admirably clear explanation of 'how it works'. I got well tangled-up in the Wikipedia link I posted. I only 'knew' of its existence because my nephew and his missis play French Horn in a symphony orchestra in China, and they've come across it with reference to traditional Chinese music...

 

[1] So, no mixolydian or dorian tunes then...🙂

Edited by lachenal74693
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3 hours ago, lachenal74693 said:

 

[1] So, no mixolydian or dorian tunes then...🙂

 

I have no idea if it’s done, but I see no reason why you couldn’t treat them the same way the relative minor is handled, above: If you have an E dorian tune, call it D major (1=D or 2=E). A mixolydian would also be in D (1=D or 5=A). Unless I’m misunderstanding what @Yuxin Ding said.

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1 hour ago, David Barnert said:

I have no idea if it’s done, but I see no reason why you couldn’t treat them the same way the relative minor is handled, above: If you have an E dorian tune, call it D major (1=D or 2=E). A mixolydian would also be in D (1=D or 5=A). Unless I’m misunderstanding what @Yuxin Ding said.

No - entirely my fault I'm afraid! My light-hearted remark about modal tunes was meant to be just that - light hearted, and I think it may have clouded the issue.

 

Presumably, 'modal' tunes can be notated using this system, we just won't see the Cmaj, DDor, Gmix key signatures we're used to (if you happen to be using ABC, that is).

 

Mea culpa! My apologies for confusing things!

Edited by lachenal74693
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