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Wheatstone 48 button


pgraves
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Probably going to need more pics.

serial number, etc.

 

but, from my limited knowledge. Off hand. To me it looks like a 50s era. They are (imo) very nice. But, generally taken to be not a desirable as the older Wheatstones. 
 

the one I had was very nice. I traded a Norman Anglo for it and ended up trading it towards an upgraded Wheatstone model. Money wise, it was @ $2000. Mine was pretty much as new. And played near perfectly.

 

but, I am making huge assumptions here with not enough data. And I am by no means any sort of expert.

 

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It seems you joined recently, possibly to get a valuation on your instrument. Nothing wrong with that in my book. But there are so many variables that it would be tough for anyone to shout out a value. On the face of it, looks like a later model, as pointed out above, 1950's. That said I picked up a 1950 aeola model when I first started (on a whim) , and it turned out to have been refurbished by Colin Dipper when the guts were examined. So I would have a look at the 'insides'. How does it 'sound'...tone etc. But I could give you an estimate, if you decide not to sell, and wander down the path of exploring the concertina... It's 'priceless!'

Edited by Stephen DOUGLASS
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Thanks for the replies.

I can take some more pictures. And also I suppose at least check that all of the notes are working. I don't have enough experience to evaluate the sound. Is serial number is in the description. I just text out the last couple of digits.

Seems to be common protocol to not show full serial numbers at least on the saxophone sites. Not exactly sure there's a great reason for it.

I'll post the pictures and play testing results later. Thanks again

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If you prefer not to show the full serial number you can look it up yourself here in the production record and a year or two either way in date will be unlikely to affect the value.   More important is the condition.  It looks good externally which is a good start, but it's quite possible it needs work on pads and valves and tuning.  

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I just play tested this and to my ear it sounds perfect. I am a musician and no what intonation is.

I inspected the bellows and it is completely intact not a single crack or worn area. To my eye and ear this looks to be in perfect playing condition.

Of course I couldn't figure out the key layout. It looks like quite an instrument to master. It sounds warm and ready exactly as I would expect it to. No notes popped out unusually loud or quietly.

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1 hour ago, pgraves said:

Mostly 5ths in each row, But a few fourths, flat fives, and minor sixths sprinkled around. What is going on!

 

 

I never quite thought of it in these terms, but a pretty accurate description of a typical English treble keyboard.

Attached diagram might be of use, showing the standard (unmodified) configuration.

english48-W842H736.gif

Edited by malcolm clapp
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3 hours ago, pgraves said:

Mostly 5ths in each row, But a few fourths, flat fives, and minor sixths sprinkled around. What is going on!

All notes work and speak clearly.

 

On each side, the middle two rows are the “white” notes, with accidentals adjacent in the outer rows. The notes of the C major scale bounce back and forth between the left and right sides.

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And if you play a tune in C, then move all your fingers one step along each row, you will be playing the same tune in G, EXCEPT for one note - the F natural needs to be replaced by the F#, by moving the finger for that note to the adjacent button in the outer row.

You can repeat the process to transpose from G to D.

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In a couple of weeks I will attempt, and certainly fail, to play chromatic scale. I will post the recording. Or maybe better, use it tuner and evaluate all the notes and report findings.

Still looking for a value range on this instrument. Thanks for your thoughts everybody.

 

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This a late period Wheatstone, which don't have a great reputation as it is said that they were often cutting corners by then. However I have a latish Wheatstone Aeola with aluminum reed frames which I like a lot.

 

On the plus side, it's likely to be in modern concert pitch and equal temperament, so not needing retuning, unless it's been left in someone's damp attic for 60 years and gone rusty.

 

I'd guess its value to an appropriate buyer is between £500 and £1000 (but I'm not a trader, so could be very wrong).

 

Can you post pictures of the reed pan? undo six screws to see it.

Edited by Paul_Hardy
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I'm not a player of the English system, but one thing in common between all the systems (which I would have expected someone to point out before now) is that value depends very much on condition. Any instrument that hasn't been used for a while is likely to need at least a basic overhaul. The more work is needed, obviously the more that will cost and therefore the less the instrument is worth before the work has been done. However this one does look in very good condition externally. Do as Paul has requested and show us what the inside looks like.

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