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Can someone identify this Lachenal Model.


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I realise that this is a Maccann Duet, and it has the typical "ENGLISH MAKE" and Free reed image trade mark of a Lachenal.

Also some helpful owner has written their name and address in it and dated it 1898, so it can't be any later than that. However I can't see any sign of a serial number (else I would have put it in that thread).

 

Distinguishing features (to me at least) is the end frame hexagon is in two parts with "Breather/sound" slots between the two. (See Pics)

Also the metal ends, rather than having a bushing plate are bushed straight into the metal. (See Pics)

 

Buttons are Bone 4.5mm

 

If looked at various pictures on the net but haven't found anything that matches this.

 

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

 

I must admit that I'd originally bought this with a few to converting/using parts to create a 40 key GD anglo.

 

 

20220912_170628[1].jpg

20220912_165236[1].jpg

Edited by Clive Thorne
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Hi Clive, I have an English, serial no 575, that I am (slowly) restoring which has the same slots cut into the action box. I had never seen that feature before. So far I have been unable to identify a maker - my first thought was Lachenal, but the action is not typical. I'd be interested to see what you find out.

incidentally, my English also has a name inscribed: Amelia Tidd. 1875.

IMG20220915084739.jpg

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Sad ( I hope you're not),

 

Thanks for your interest.

 

 

I make it out to be:

W Morton

193. Milton (Road/Street),*

Sheffield.

And I see that the date actually says March 1898.

 


* Google maps shows that Sheffield has both. Milton Road (now only seems to go to 100) and 193 Milton Street seems to be Old Brick built industrial units which are scheduled for conversion to flats.

 

However, being only a 46 key I guess that the player was not a professional or of any particular note.

 

804386684_20220912_1658191.thumb.jpg.98714ae9dbea7bf7c252f0b88300be96.jpg

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13 hours ago, Clive Thorne said:

Sad ( I hope you're not),

 

Thanks for your interest.

 

 

I make it out to be:

W Morton

193. Milton (Road/Street),*

Sheffield.

And I see that the date actually says March 1898.

 


* Google maps shows that Sheffield has both. Milton Road (now only seems to go to 100) and 193 Milton Street seems to be Old Brick built industrial units which are scheduled for conversion to flats.

 

However, being only a 46 key I guess that the player was not a professional or of any particular note.

 

804386684_20220912_1658191.thumb.jpg.98714ae9dbea7bf7c252f0b88300be96.jpg

 

Clive, unfortunately W Morton was not at that address in either the 1891 or 1901 census. The property though was a rented shop with accomodation, both the 1891 & 1901 occupants were Grocer's by trade so it's probably fair to accept W Morton was the same. He was advertising for a servant in 1896.

 

Snap 2022-09-15 at 20.14.47.png

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On 9/17/2022 at 1:36 PM, Clive Thorne said:

Wow Sad,

 

That's amazing.

Where do you find this sort of information out?

 

Clive.

Clive...the census records were checked through Findmypast and Ancestry, the newspaper advert came from The British Newspaper Archive.

   We dropped a little unlucky that Mr Morton wasn't at the address in the 1891 or 1901 census'...that would have given us his forename and other family member names that we could use to really track him down.

   We could use electoral rolls that may give extra information but unfortunately Sheffield's are not online...visit to the archives in person only. I also used the search for W Morton, Grocer, Sheffield, 1891-1901 and did find one, unfortunately at an address in Grimesthorpe Road in 1891 and 1901, so probably not our man.

 

 My guess is that he took the shop but it was not a success ( although I can find no record of a bankruptcy) and after a couple of years went back to his original trade. He could have died of course...there are four deaths for W Morton's in Sheffield between 1898 and 1901 but without ordering death certificates there is no way of knowing if any are our man. If you were interested enough you could order the certificates one by one at £7 from the GRO, you might strike gold with the first, however Mr Morton may not have died in which case it would be money wasted...you never know till you try.

 

   The house was condemned in the slum clearances of 1939 but the picture below( from Picture Sheffield) is from the 1960's when the street was still up, it shows No's 131 to 143, suggesting 193 would have been 25 houses around the corner.

Andy

  

Snap 2022-09-19 at 01.01.40.png

Edited by sadbrewer
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On 9/15/2022 at 12:47 PM, Clive Thorne said:

Can someone say if the bushing straight to the metal end was standard for Lachenal around that time?

 

I've only ever seen that style of bushing once before, and (who knows but) it could have been on the same instrument?

 

Whilst vents in the sides of the action box, sometimes "portholes", or even fretwork, are not unheard of - they simply make it easier for the player to hear the sound that is coming out of the ends - like monitors.

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Thanks again Stephen.

Photos attached.

Also a close up examination of the Stepped end "Spacer" shows it to have glue remnants, - ie as if it may have had wooden ends glued on at some point.

 

Further information is that the left hand reed plate, and both bellow ends have the number "816" stamped into them. I had seen this before, but assumed that it was too short to be a serial number, but possibly not?

 

And (finally?) it has also had an additional key fitted on the left hand side at some point, with the reed in the middle of the pan, so it is actually a 47 key Macaan! This one is not bushed, and is fitted through the fretwork. Highlighted in the photo.

 

 

Glue.jpg

ends.jpg

Edited by Clive Thorne
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7 hours ago, Clive Thorne said:

Also a close up examination of the Stepped end "Spacer" shows it to have glue remnants, - ie as if it may have had wooden ends glued on at some point.

 

I was surmising that it would originally have had a wooden end, and that the action box wasn't tall enough to leave room for a normal bushing-board that was screwed to the fretwork - so hence they came up with this highly-unusual means of bushing the ends...

 

The fretwork design in the metal ends looks like it originated with Lachenal's, but it's never been drilled for the holes for the tiny screws that normally hold the wooden bushing-board attached.

 

Quote

Further information is that the left hand reed plate, and both bellow ends have the number "816" stamped into them. I had seen this before, but assumed that it was too short to be a serial number, but possibly not?

 

I have the remains of a Maccann with a 2-digit serial number, never mind a 3-digit one, #816 would have been made in 1890.

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Thank you all for some brilliant information and insights.

 

I've now got to decide whether to proceed with my original idea of converting it/using parts to make a GD anglo. I feel a bit bad about that  now that I know more about it and it's history. However I have no real interest in playing it as a Maccaan duet, and if I did I gather that a 46 key is pretty limited. So it's either convert it or move it on I guess.

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On 9/21/2022 at 7:27 AM, Stephen Chambers said:

 

I was surmising that it would originally have had a wooden end, and that the action box wasn't tall enough to leave room for a normal bushing-board that was screwed to the fretwork - so hence they came up with this highly-unusual means of bushing the ends...

 

The fretwork design in the metal ends looks like it originated with Lachenal's, but it's never been drilled for the holes for the tiny screws that normally hold the wooden bushing-board attached.

 

You've hit the nail on the head Stephen.

Usually the height of the side walls of the action box would be increased to allow the inclusion of a bushing wood (board) and the new metal top drilled for securing it.  However, the side apertures make his difficult.

 

Geoff

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