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Concertina imports from overseas to the USA, how much tax / duty is required?


Notemaker
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Looking at McNeila, (Dublin Ireland), Concertinas and wondering how much extra cost will be added for tax / import duty, if I purchase from there.

 

Any help muchly appreciated.

 

Thank you.

 

 

Edited by Notemaker
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  • Notemaker changed the title to Concertina imports from overseas to the USA, how much tax / duty is required?

I bought a "Swan" concertina from McNeela several months ago, and they charged me the price listed on the website plus a 19 euro shipping fee (shipped to California), no tax or import duty fees.

image.thumb.png.14acb064b43cf9f44df17baab46ba683.png

 

 

A word of caution though: I recently contacted McNeela about their trade-in policy for upgrading to a nicer concertina, and they informed me that my several-months-old Swan concertina I just bought from them would only be worth about 35% of its original value as a trade-in toward a nicer instrument. I believe other makers (concertina connection, handmade models from irish concertina company, etc) offer a 100% trade-in toward higher end models.

 

Out of curiosity, which instrument are you interested in?

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I bought a USD 800 concertina from McNeila. Shipping was quick and I didn't have to pay anything more than what McNeila charged me.

 

But exactly 2 years ago, I bought a USD 3200 concertina from another seller also in Ireland. UPS hold it hostage until I paid them $200 (or $250?) "import fee". I think it was because the declared value exceeded a certain limit (USD 2500?).

 

It was not the seller's fault. He was surprised by the 'import fee' as well and offered to pay for it but I didn't want him to. He later tried to make up for the trouble by sending me a nice soft case.

Edited by pentaprism
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UPS does not put any effort into identifying the instrument classification and the duty.  They will get it wrong without a care.  Do your own research in advance and have the forms and your tax number submitted with the package.  (Better to use another shipper.)  Search for the "Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States".  A piano accordion is free and just below that is listed "other" with a rate of 2.6%, however some trading partners are designated "free".  The heading for "other" is 9205.90.18.  The piano accordion is 9205.90.15.  We have a free trade agreement with Canada for Canadian goods and UPS asked for a 5.3% duty from me without ever asking if it met any criterion for less.Screenshot_20220812-063646-1081.thumb.png.596cbc2fe0582d9ade777c0cac181a49.png

Edited by David Lay
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3 hours ago, chip said:

I bought a "Swan" concertina from McNeela several months ago, and they charged me the price listed on the website plus a 19 euro shipping fee (shipped to California), no tax or import duty fees.

image.thumb.png.14acb064b43cf9f44df17baab46ba683.png

 

 

A word of caution though: I recently contacted McNeela about their trade-in policy for upgrading to a nicer concertina, and they informed me that my several-months-old Swan concertina I just bought from them would only be worth about 35% of its original value as a trade-in toward a nicer instrument. I believe other makers (concertina connection, handmade models from irish concertina company, etc) offer a 100% trade-in toward higher end models.

 

Out of curiosity, which instrument are you interested in?

Well I could only find one which https://mcneelamusic.com/concertinas/the-phoenix-concertina/  I liked with the Jeffries layout, and am thinking about it.

Yet if, instead, I find something similar elsewhere may have a go at it 

I should mention, already have, and enjoy, a beautiful original Crabb 30 Btn C/G made in April 1965 by Henry and Neville Crabb. But; it is Wheatstone layout which sort of blocks me from some pieces best done in the Jeffries. I did consider modifying my beloved Crabb, but when I realized that would mean cutting on the reed slots, decided against. Most especially as the 2nd playing owner and the lovely condition of the instrument; it would be a crime to destroy an original !

 

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In my experience it is always best to ship with USPS/Royal Mail/Canada post than with any of the courier companies.  The couriers are lazy with the duties and always charge.  Post office most often just comes in without duties/taxes - but not always.

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3 hours ago, Paul Read said:

In my experience it is always best to ship with USPS....

 

I don't know about shipping from Canada, but the statement above, in my experience, is true for shipping from the US.

 

I used to sell photography gears and shipped many cameras/lenses to overseas. I always used USPS. At least the import/export charge, if any, was known up front. I never had a case in which the shipper held the package hostage until the 'fee' (of which amount I would have no control over) was paid.

 

But the original question is about shipping from Ireland to the US.

Edited by pentaprism
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