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Watch out with that Central Heating


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1 hour ago, David Barnert said:

And, of course, we often have no control over the conditions in the rooms we play in.

So you add to the list of things your bring--your instrument, your music, your music stand, etc--you bring your own air!

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1 hour ago, David Barnert said:

And, of course, we often have no control over the conditions in the rooms we play in.

True, but I would not have thought that the wood would dry out excessively in a few hours.

 

45% to 55% RH is recommended for humans and I think that is a good range for wooden instruments.

 

I have a 'Govee' hygrometer that I bought off Amazon that broadcasts its data over bluetooth.  I can put it in the case with my concertina and keep an eye on the humidity inside the case with an app on my phone.  It  shows me graphs of temp and humidity over several weeks. 

 

A bit (or a lot?) geeky, but there you are.

 

 

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8 hours ago, Ruairi said:

Jody, that's good to knonononononononow :)

But on a serious note, can I just clarify that you're saying that the tension/tightness of the end screws is that relevant to helping with expanding/contracting frames? Are they not at risk of being stripped if they're not sufficiently tight? And I don't mean really tight, but just more so than you mention? Or is it the opposite case? I'm returning to my natural state of confusion with this instrument....

Thanks

Ruairi

I'm just saying that I don't want the end screws to be super tight or too loose either, so a seasonal adjustment bringing them just snug enough is in order. I like to check them twice a year in early summer and winter.

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This is good advice Jody. I live in Canada, and between the very cold dry winters and quite humid warm summers, I've noticed end bolts on my Jeffries become very tight in the summer months if I haven't backed them off.

 

In the winter, without a humidifier it can get excessively dry in the house. I once had a banjo head self-destruct because of the dryness. I run two humidifiers and can keep the main floor around 40% humidity. The instruments are much happier these days. 

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That's very helpful; I think I live in the same kind of environment in Ohio, very hot and humid summers and very cold and dry winters, so I will definitely follow this advice. Sohcahtoa, my tenor banjo has never exploded despite my wife's wishes, but we'll see how summer treats the new concertina (which she loves!)

Also, it was mentioned in a related discussion that certain woods react differently to humidity and such, which I assumed to be true but I don't know the extent of their reaction; my concertina has Rosewood ends, mainly due to my preference for it on guitar necks which is probably not the best reason for picking it; does anyone have any thoughts on how this affects these issues?

Many thanks,

Ruairi

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10 hours ago, Marcus said:

Humidity here in Bermuda hangs around about 85% most of the time and during the hottest times around 95 to 99%. 

 

With that much humidity I would be concerned about mould on the leather parts.

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I remember reading something about action end warping many years ago, and the solution was said to be putting a layer of damp sawdust on the end, and leave it until the warp righted itself. Anybody like to comment?

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6 hours ago, wes williams said:

I remember reading something about action end warping many years ago, and the solution was said to be putting a layer of damp sawdust on the end, and leave it until the warp righted itself. Anybody like to comment?

 

I'm dubious that it would be a permanent cure. If you add moisture to one side of a board, it expands unevenly and causes it to bend, the wetter side becoming more convex. Eventually it will dry out and bend back again, unless you've mechanically prevented it from moving. Clamping a warped board flat can sometimes create a lot of tension, potentially causing glue joints to fail or even splitting the wood.

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Posted (edited)

I wonder, on this issue of "wood warping,".. if in fact having metal face plate is advantage over wooden facing on concertina?

I imagine it has that advantage; whatever metal sheeting used.

I wouldn't say using sawdust is a good idea for absorbing damp or correcting warping .

Edited by SIMON GABRIELOW
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The material the end is made from will make no difference as the potential warping is in the reed pan and pad board. As far as the sawdust goes, you have misunderstood the use of it. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 5/29/2022 at 3:39 PM, Chris Ghent said:

The material the end is made from will make no difference as the potential warping is in the reed pan and pad board. As far as the sawdust goes, you have misunderstood the use of it. 

That's a relief to know, thanks Chris, only 999 concertina problems left to solve,,,,

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