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Hex case question.


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Question about the hex type cases. 
 

I have never seen one in real life, I have always dealt with the box type cases. The question I have is. As the concertina rests on its end. How much protectection is there on the end? Are there stand offs in the end? If the case is dropped or put down hard is it subject to damaging the end?

 

also. As a functional question. Is there any sort of issue with buttons being depressed for long term? I am assuming that resting it the end will depress buttons?

 

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It should probably be mentioned there are horizontal hex cases as well. They were particularly prevalent in Ireland  during the nineties when it was harder to find concertina  cases and these were readily available through Custy's, made for them by fiddleplayer Joe Ryan. 

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3 minutes ago, Peter Laban said:

It should probably be mentioned there are horizontal hex cases as well. They were particularly prevalent in Ireland  during the nineties when it was harder to find concertina  cases and these were readily available through Custy's, made for them by fiddleplayer Joe Ryan. 


i have not seen this, that I know of. 
but I am guessing it would still be the same? In that the concertina ends rest against the case ends?

 

but from the pics I have seen. It appears that, generally, there are wood sides and ends with little more than fabric (looks like velvet). It seems that this would likely put pressure on the ends, hand rests or buttons. But also, even though it is generally snug. I would guess there would be very little in the way of shock protection.

 

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[quote] I am guessing it would still be the same? In that the concertina ends rest against the case ends? [/quote]

 

Not necessarily, the concertina doesn't stand on its ends and there's a bit of a buffer there that keeps the buttons free from the sides.

Edited by Peter Laban
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1 minute ago, Peter Laban said:

[quote] I am guessing it would still be the same? In that the concertina ends rest against the case ends? [/quote]

 

Not necessarily, there's a bit of a buffer there that keeps the buttons free from the sides.

I am supposing that generally these types of cases are well over 100 years old. What was used? And isn’t it prone to break down or getting compressed to losing any sort of cushioning?

 

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I made a horizontal one once. It has padded corner blocks that prevent the buttons touching anything.

Scroll down to the near the bottom of this article:

https://www.holdenconcertinas.com/?p=1718

 

They look quite fancy, but I think conventional cuboid hard cases are a bit more practical, as well as easier to make.

 

Carroll makes horizontal hex cases too, but I don't know what the inside looks like:

https://www.carrollconcertinas.com/photo-gallery.html

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In the old wood hex cases there were generally three fabric covered wood blocks to support 50% of the six corners and keep the buttons from being depressed.  Not much in the way of mitigating shock to the instrument if the case was dropped.

 

There was also the ever present danger of bellows wear as the instrument was removed and reinserted in the traditional "end up" wooden case.  There are horror stories of instruments being "trapped" in perhaps wooden cases that were not the original size as sold with the concertina.

 

Some of the leather Jeffries hexagonal "jug" cases came with the same caveat.  The concertina had one safe orientation into the case.  if the end in was reversed or the hex orientation rotated a cherished instrument could be difficult to removed and possibly damaged.

 

I will occasionally ship an instrument in a hex case to insure its safe passage but only with a strong suggestion the new owner find a proper case.

 

The old wood hex cases and leather jug cases make excellent "stand alone" mantle displays.

 

Greg

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One main reason for using a square shape is thar the instrument sits ithe correct plane, if it sits on one end over time half of the valves can harden away from the reed pan thus requiring renew of said valves . It could be the victorian design to get service business in music shops.

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As Mike says, the concertina should be stored with it's axis horizontal, otherwise the valves are deformed by gravity and will take permanent curl away from the reed pan. This causes all sorts of playing issues and odd popping sounds. Depending on conditions valve life can be reduced by 50% or more. What started as a good idea years ago is death to valves and hence sheep.

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7 hours ago, Peter Laban said:

It should probably be mentioned there are horizontal hex cases as well. They were particularly prevalent in Ireland  during the nineties when it was harder to find concertina  cases and these were readily available through Custy's, made for them by fiddleplayer Joe Ryan. 

 

I have one of them, probably, purchased in 1999 at Custy's. I remember hearing that John O'Connor or Pat O'Connor made it, but I could be wrong.

ssR0014142.jpg.c12b54d2803a725525537440926c7e70.jpgssR0014143.jpg.ce3d336eb2a7931f3e97f4d061f7b2e1.jpg

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In speaking of hex cases, Carroll Concertinas has begun delivering their concertinas in a freshly designed hex case. The workmanship is beautiful. I have one of these cases and previously had a molded hex case. Hex cases can have their drawbacks which include being difficult to keep the case in place when inserting or removing the concertina. Some can “dump” the concertina out if the latch becomes undone while carrying - that is not an issue with the Carroll case which has double latched straps to protect the case from accidental opening. In general, I would say that the small rectangular cases currently made for concertinas are best for handling and stability, but cases like the Carroll one are well cushioned inside, are beautiful supplements for your “kit”, and do an excellent job of protecting the instrument inside - possibly a better job of protection than rectangular cases. Just one man’s opinion.

 

Ross Schlabach

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11 hours ago, alex_holden said:

I made a horizontal one once. [...] They look quite fancy, but I think conventional cuboid hard cases are a bit more practical, as well as easier to make.

 

I think I commented on this when you first posted it, but that case is mouth-wateringly beautiful. Practical or not, I'd buy one from you in a heartbeat. Soon as I have an instrument worthy of it.

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12 hours ago, Takayuki YAGI said:

 

I have one of them, probably, purchased in 1999 at Custy's. I remember hearing that John O'Connor or Pat O'Connor made it, but I could be wrong.

ssR0014142.jpg.c12b54d2803a725525537440926c7e70.jpgssR0014143.jpg.ce3d336eb2a7931f3e97f4d061f7b2e1.jpg

 

That looks slightly more basic than the one I have or the ones I have seen. Quite possible John and Pat made them but Joe Ryan was the main producer of that sort of case. I have seen him deliver abatches of them on occasion.

 

My son took away his concertina in it so I can't immediately supply an image.

 

Quote

One main reason for using a square shape is thar the instrument sits ithe correct plane

 

As it , obviously, does  in a horizontal hex case.

Edited by Peter Laban
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On the subject of boxes; my own concertina is carefully stored inside my own square shaped box.  And, importantly, it is slipped into a very thick, padded cloth bag, which pads and protects it once inside. The bag has a sort of satin material stitched into it, and so takes all the simple bulk of the instrument itself, and cushions against pressure on buttons..

At the end of the day why not; make yourself ( or get someone) to stitch you up a cloth sack, or bag to keep them in?

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Adding to box topic; many years ago I had someone make a super soft padded sort of sack to put the instrument inside.  After use, I lower instrument into box, and then it slides into the box, [the square box].. and this stops instrument getting knocked, and probably reduces pressure on buttons too! Well, over 23 years, the bellows are hardly worn at all so it helps to protect in that way as bonus.

So get your sewing kit out; or a great maiden Aunt to make you a soft padded bag to keep your concertina inside; loved and padded.  You can almost imagine it snoozing inside there it is so soft and comfortable!! [ I have to say that.. I  haven't hear it snoring yet though!]..

DSCF0389smallsize.jpg

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When talking about concertina cases, it is equally important to remember that, not only must the axis of the instrument be horizontal, but the bellows should be firmly held closed. Whilst not good practise to have holding pressure on the keys, I don't see a real technical issue with it. 

 

Gig bags, sacks, padded bags may provide protection against shock, but they do not guarantee that the instrument axis is horizontal and that the bellows are held firmly compressed. 

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2 hours ago, d.elliott said:

When talking about concertina cases, it is equally important to remember that, not only must the axis of the instrument be horizontal, but the bellows should be firmly held closed. Whilst not good practise to have holding pressure on the keys, I don't see a real technical issue with it. 

 

Gig bags, sacks, padded bags may provide protection against shock, but they do not guarantee that the instrument axis is horizontal and that the bellows are held firmly compressed. 


 

I have to think that any sort of, near constant pressure on the buttons, and therefore the springs can lead to issues? At some point, won’t the springs “closed” default position become memorized by the springs?


 

but.. I have to think that the best case option, from a practical, protective perspective is a plastic, pelican type case with @ 1-2” of closed cell foam all around. 

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