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If You Could Design Your Own Concertina Case...


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The problem with the soft bags is the damage issue if dropped. 

 

Or in my case some years ago, if the soft bag is struck in a sideways impact while resting on the ground. The instrument needed a new end and the bellows were also damaged. No one saw it happen and we will never know what struck it. Colin Dipper asked if it had been run over by a car.

 

- John Wild

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post-82-1117022858_thumb.jpgHere's one I made earlyer from ash with hardwood dowels for added strength. It has bits inside to keep the bellows together and I found some sticky-back felt to line the inside. Note the catches round the side rather than the usual place to avoid the odd angle.

 

 

Peter,

I like your side placement of the latches. Too many times have I lifted my case up with the latches facing toward me and caught one on my pants and popped it open. It's a good thing I still have quick reflexes. Your placement would eliminThe half again portion would have a spring loaded inside lid for storage of extra springs/etc, tools and the lid would have a pocket for a cigar humidifier for the dry winters. This would add extra weight but I don't usually walk too far carrying my concertina.

Your glove design certainly eliminates alot of dead air space from the cubed box style. I know that it is just an old design put on its side but I like it. Now, just add an outside accessable container for the humidifier/dehumidifier and I'd buy it.

 

Steve

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I've done 'hard' (sturdy-object) crochet around brass hoops and made tubular-type holders -- they are NOT good as concertina cases for serious transporation, but I really prefer the crocheted holders (my avatar pic is one, plus I have more pics at my site) for just moving around the house, etc..

 

Bellowbelle,

 

I've always admired your avatar (well, for the few months I've been using/reading this messageboard)... it's so pretty and cute. I didn't realize it was a concertina cover, I thought you'd decorated your actual concertina somehow (and then added the flowers for the picture). Anyway, it's really nice, makes me wish I could crochet!

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Oh, also....

 

s2maur,

 

You use a humidifier and a dehumidifier? That's interesting, I'd never heard about using cigar humidifiers... is this necessary? I thought that humidity was bad for the concertina and that I should keep it a dry as possible. I'd love to hear your thoughts (or anyone elses as well) on this, even if winter's not exactly just around the corner right now.

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My Wheatstone came with a case about which I have several comments.

 

First of all, the one time the instrument took a serious fall (1995, when it and I tripped on a fire escape--I took a few sutures in my foot and the instrument was thrown into the bars of a wrought iron fence) the case took the bruises (you can still see the twist pattern of the iron bars) and the concertina was entirely spared.

 

Two, soon after I got it (1994) I burrowed a little hole in the padding that a tiny (about 3 inches long) hollow-ground screwdriver fits into.

 

Three, in recent years, the foam padding has begun to deteriorate, and I find bits of foam dust inside my instrument, where it certainly doesn't belong. If I were building a case, I'd want to use a padding that does not involve direct contact between foam rubber and the concertina.

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Oh, also....

 

s2maur,

 

You use a humidifier and a dehumidifier? That's interesting, I'd never heard about using cigar humidifiers... is this necessary? I thought that humidity was bad for the concertina and that I should keep it a dry as possible. I'd love to hear your thoughts (or anyone elses as well) on this, even if winter's not exactly just around the corner right now.

 

gretchen,

Sorry it has taken me so long to respond.

I use the humidifier in the winter time here in Iowa when the humidity is as low as 15% at times and as high as 25%. The instruments seem to play better with a bit more humidification that what our winters can offer naturally not to mention how easy the wood ends start to develop cracks at that low of a moisture level. The cigar humidifiers don't drip water and keep the level at about 45%. Now, at the opposite extreme here in Iowa, USA the level can reach 85% and above and for several days if not weeks. We get a steady stream of Gulf Stream moisture laden air. So, I don't use the humidifier and the de-humidifier at the same time but each seasonally as needed to ensure that the instrument's environment is at a healthy mixture.

Temperature plays an important part in achieving the overall perfect environmenta. mix for a concertina but that topic is in the archives for all to re-read.

 

Steve

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If I were building a case, I'd want to use a padding that does not involve direct contact between foam rubber and the concertina.

 

Yeah, I've been thinking about that. I always line the foam with fake fur, but I'm wondering if the fibers could come off over time and find their way into the reed pan. I might go with a shorter-fiber lining, like velvet: something less likely to shed. Any suggestions? I've never used anything but fake fur. By the way, here's the case I'll be using as a shell.

 

 

kcd200blu.jpg

 

It's W18" X H9" X D11", so I'll have room for accessories plus plenty of foam to absorb impact.

Edited by Jeff Stallard
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Some of you may have already discovered this, but I found that an easy way to cut high-density foam rubber is with an electric carving knife. I then use 3M spray adhesive to adhere it to almost any surface. (The application here is car audio vibration damping)

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Oh, also....

 

s2maur,

 

You use a humidifier and a dehumidifier? That's interesting, I'd never heard about using cigar humidifiers... is this necessary? I thought that humidity was bad for the concertina and that I should keep it a dry as possible. I'd love to hear your thoughts (or anyone elses as well) on this, even if winter's not exactly just around the corner right now.

 

gretchen,

Sorry it has taken me so long to respond.

I use the humidifier in the winter time here in Iowa when the humidity is as low as 15% at times and as high as 25%. The instruments seem to play better with a bit more humidification that what our winters can offer naturally not to mention how easy the wood ends start to develop cracks at that low of a moisture level. The cigar humidifiers don't drip water and keep the level at about 45%. Now, at the opposite extreme here in Iowa, USA the level can reach 85% and above and for several days if not weeks. We get a steady stream of Gulf Stream moisture laden air. So, I don't use the humidifier and the de-humidifier at the same time but each seasonally as needed to ensure that the instrument's environment is at a healthy mixture.

Temperature plays an important part in achieving the overall perfect environmenta. mix for a concertina but that topic is in the archives for all to re-read.

 

Steve

 

Thanks for the info! I only got my concertina a month or two ago so I haven't had to worry about such things yet... though I may be moving to Japan for a while in a couple of months... in a place which I have heard is extremely humid. I was looking into those dehumidifiers that the button box sells (and a few other things as well) but I'm worried that they wont get my order up to Canada before I'm off to Japan. I guess I'll be looking around for some other alternative, maybe that rice thing?

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Three, in recent years, the foam padding has begun to deteriorate, and I find bits of foam dust inside my instrument, where it certainly doesn't belong. If I were building a case, I'd want to use a padding that does not involve direct contact between foam rubber and the concertina.

 

 

I have had this problem. I use a square silk scarf, which I place inside the case, then put the concertina inside the scarf. Diagonally opposite corners can be knotted.

 

- John Wild

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I wrap my concertina in a cut down bath towel. It stops the instrument moving around in the case, and the towel really came in handy when we were travelling :P

 

Cheers

Morgana

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My Wheatstone came with a case....

...I got it (1994)...

...in recent years, the foam padding has begun to deteriorate, and I find bits of foam dust inside my instrument, where it certainly doesn't belong. If I were building a case, I'd want to use a padding that does not involve direct contact between foam rubber and the concertina.

The foam should be covered with fabric, as well as being of a sort that doesn't deteriorate for many decades, at least. Or... no foam at all.

 

None of my hard cases have padding.

They all have blocking, to hold the instrument firmly in place.

In all cases, the blocking is wood, not foam.

They all have the interior lined with velvet or something similar, which also covers the blocking material.

My Wheatstone case contemporary with David's has wood blocking, and no foam.

 

I have seen cases of this sort protect the instruments inside in spite of various forms of "abuse", including:

... Impacting various objects, while swinging from a shoulder strap.

... Being knocked from a table to a concrete floor.

... Falling from the top of a car as it drove off.

... In two cases (pun acknowledged), being driven over by a car. In both these instances the case was destroyed, but the instrument suffered minimal damage. In the one, a small area of the fretwork caved in. In the other, one thumbstrap thumbscrew was sheared off even with the wood of the end, but otherwise there was not even a scratch.

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