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nils

Yg? Yc?

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There are initials in the fretwork of my New Model. Does anybody know the meaning?

 

Nils

 

 

post-465-1116513114_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

post-465-1116513178_thumb.jpg

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I see no intials!

I see what Nils is referring to, but I believe it's just a coincidence of the curlicues in the design. With a bit of imagination, I can also see an "S" below the inner edge of the thumbstrap in the full photo, a "G" left of center at the bottom, which could also be the lower loop of a cursive "E". If those curves were really meant to be initials, they would be clearer, as in the Boyd, Salvation Army, and SM instruments. (Sorry, no time to locate links to those right now.)

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If those curves were really meant to be initials, they would be clearer, as in the Boyd, Salvation Army ... instruments.  (Sorry, no time to locate links to those right now.)

Here is the H.Boyd name:

post-436-1116557213_thumb.jpg

 

And S, to the left of the buttons, and A, to the right, for Salvation Army:

post-436-1116560901_thumb.jpg

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If you look hard enough and use some imagination, you will also see 666 in the fretwork. Do not be alarmed.

 

Psychologists sometimes use concertina fretwork as a Rorschach test for musicians. If you can see naked ladies or pint pots in the fretwork, you are normal.

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If you can see naked ladies or pint pots in the fretwork, you are normal.

 

What if I see Naked ladies holding pints beckoning me?

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Thanks for your skillful observations, but my "Beautiful Mind" is still convinced those patterns are letters.

 

Reasons:

There is no other spot with a similar pattern in the fretwork, other patterns are repeated.

I havn't seen any other concertina with a fretwork where I could find "accidental" letters.

The 19th century craftsmen designed their concertinas very carefully, so a piece of fretwork that could be taken for something it was not meant to be would not have been acceptable.

 

If this fretwork keeps it's secret, maybe you've got one with another riddle in it?

 

Nils

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If this fretwork keeps it's secret, maybe you've got one with another riddle in it?

 

I still don't see those letters.....I do, however, see the wrod "Coors" to the left of the finger rest....

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It think they probably are letters, intentionally put there. The "y" especially has a very different look from the rest of the fretwork. There's no other clean "U" shape like that anywhere else on that end.

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It think they probably are letters, intentionally put there.  The "y" especially has a very different look from the rest of the fretwork.  There's no other clean "U" shape like that anywhere else on that end.

Then shouldn't it be interpreted as a "U", rather than a "Y"? The "tail" of the "Y" trails off into a divided leaflet, as does the bottom of the "C" curve, and I personally don't think even the "U" is anywhere near as "clean" as any of the letters in the "H Boyd" or "S A" examples. In fact, the "S" lying on its side above the alleged "YC" is much cleaner, though I don't think that was intended as a letter, either. But distorted versions of the "S" and "C", as well as several other elements, are mirrored in distorted form on the opposite side of the center line. Yet none of the elements are mirrored exactly, which is why I wouldn't be surprised that a juxtaposition of different imprecise patterns could produce something suggestive purely by coincidence.

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For anyone still having trouble seeing it, I have highlighted it here.

post-65-1116733452_thumb.jpg

I included the end bolt at the top left for orientation.

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Now this is no reflection on Nils conviction that he is seeing letters in his fretwork. But I'll be a bit crass and suggest I've started seeing something in the fretwork of a large duet I have. I think I can make it out. Yes, of course, it says:

 

"Your message here! Contact Greg J for rental details!"

(Nickel silver, wood, or Dr. Dave"s neon available)

 

(My apologies, Nils. I couldn't resist!)

 

Greg J

Edited by Greg Jowaisas

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With a bit of imagination, I can also see an "S" below the inner edge of the thumbstrap in the full photo, a "G" left of center at the bottom, which could also be the lower loop of a cursive "E".

Perhaps, but these examples are mirrored symmetrically in the fretwork on the other side of an imagined vertical center line. The "YC" isn't. In fact, if you take the photo of the full side and compare it with a horizontally flipped version of the same picture, you will see that it is virtually all symmetrical (at least approximately) except around the edges of the buttons, the pinky rest and the thumb strap.

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With a bit of imagination, I can also see an "S" below the inner edge of the thumbstrap in the full photo, a "G" left of center at the bottom, which could also be the lower loop of a cursive "E".

Perhaps, but these examples are mirrored symmetrically in the fretwork on the other side of an imagined vertical center line. The "YC" isn't. In fact, if you take the photo of the full side and compare it with a horizontally flipped version of the same picture, you will see that it is virtually all symmetrical (at least approximately) except around the edges of the buttons, the pinky rest and the thumb strap.

I myself mentioned the approximate -- or as I said, "distorted" -- mirroring. I also pointed out -- verbally, since I'm not able to mark up an image as you did -- that at least the "C" of the purported "YC" is so mirrored. So are the "tail" of the "Y" (emerging from between the first two rows of buttons to right of center), its splitting into three leaflets (David, why did you exclude the other two leaflets from your coloring of the tail? they are not independent), and the extended curl which diverges from the tail's lower side (diverging just as the right-of-center "tail" exits the buttons). In fact, there's an arc on the right side which, though not as tightly curved, touches both the "S" above and the extended curl below in much the same way as the curl at the top left of the "Y" (or "U"). So the only "unique" feature of the purported "YC" is the reflexing of that particular left-side curl. Hardly definitive of a 2-letter monogram, in my estimation.

 

Apart from the lack of clarity and ambiguity of the "Y" (or is it a "U"?) and the "C" (or is it a "G"?), I would expect that explicitly incorporated letters would be highlighted by deliberately not having any of their parts "mirrored". That's certainly the case with the "SA" and "H Boyd".

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... these examples are mirrored symmetrically in the fretwork on the other side of an imagined vertical center line. The "YC" isn't.

As far as I can see the "c" is echoed on the other side of the centre line, but it replaces the "y" device, which is necessary simply because the fingering layout requires a shorter device on that side. The fretwork can never be symmetrical at that point because the key layout isn't.

Edited by Stephen Chambers

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