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Swan or Lachenal


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After as week of reading as much as I can, it seem slike a Swan from McNeely or a 30 button Lachenal is what I'm looking at. Although I would have to wait longer for the Lachenal unless a great deal came along.

 

OR I could just buy cheap Rochelle to see if I like it heh.

 

Any advice between the swan and lachenal for a beginner?

 

Thank you

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Lachenal would probably hold value more, if that is a consideration. But, over time, would it require more service? Not sure. Ease of action etc would be the biggest factor in your learning to play. With some caveats, I have always thought a new player should buy the best instrument he can afford. Maybe you should buy the Rochelle to get started (why wait to begin learning to play) while you save for the Lachenal. The Rochelle could be your companion while trekking. 

Edited by Everett
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Hello, melasOnos,

 

It would be difficult to buy a 30 button Lachenal "at a great deal".

If a Lachenal looks like at a bargain price, you should assume that it has some defects or trouble and would cost you a lot to bring it to playable condition. 

24 or 26 button Lachenal from a reliable dealer could be an option, as they tend to be lower-priced than 30 button instruments. 

 

For example, a 26 button Lachnel sold at Barleycorn is priced at 750GBP, which is competitve price to a McNeela Swan.

https://concertina.co.uk/stock-selection/anglo-concertinas/lachenal-26-key-anglo-in-c-g-with-steel-reeds/

 

I used to hav a McNeela Swan. It is not a bad instrument for its price, but I am sure you would be tempted to upgrade to a better instrument in less than a year. McNeela offers trade-in program, but trade-in value is not very high. The trade-in price they offerd was not very high and I sold the Swan to my friend instead.

 

I do not have a Rochelle, but I do not read any bad impression  or rumors on the net about it, execpt for being a bit slow and very bulky. Concertina Connection offers a trade-in program for upgrading to Concertina Connection's higer grade instrument, and the trade-in value is 100% of your purchase price. That means, you can upgrade to Minstrel, Clover and Wakker Concertinas in the future without losing any money.  Recently introduced Rochelle-2 is a bit pricy but about the size of satndard concertinas. 

 

Ducklings could be another option to get started cheap, but the current waiting time is something like 16 months. 

I started from Concertina Connection's Minstrel with Wakker Bellows upgrade. It was far beyond my expected budget, but I am quite happy that it was my first instrument. After 3 1/2 years, I still enjoy plyaing it and have no idea of letting it go. 

Have a happy concertina life!

Totani

Edited by gtotani
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Hi

 

If you can afford a Lachenal rather than a hybrid with accordion reeds I recommend the Lachenal. The hybrids are good for beginners because usually the action and response are good and won't hold you back. But the tone does not have the richness of a concertina reeded instrument.

 

I just think there is something special about a lovely old instrument (if it is a good one). It's the aesthetics of old craftsmanship, richness of sound and having the real thing, not to mention resale will be easier.

 

This instrument that is listed in the for sale section seems like good choice.

I have no relation or benefit in recommending this, I just think it looks lovely and if David restored it and recommends it, you can take that to the bank.

 

This lachenal might not be as quick or agile as a new hybrid, and be more challenging to play at first(or not) but I believe some advice I received when I was fretting over what concertina to acquire: "Just find a good instrument and learn how to play IT".

 

Richard

 

 

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Thank you all for the consideration.

 

I thought more of this. Considering I am a paycheck-to-paycheck kind / sole bread-winner type of person, and I would inevitably be dissapointed in a cheap model. I probably just won't get one. Maybe one day when I hit the jackpot, but for the price of a crappy car...

 

Thanks again everyone. I'll continue enjoying listening to these beautiful things!

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6 hours ago, melas0nos said:

Thank you all for the consideration.

 

I thought more of this. Considering I am a paycheck-to-paycheck kind / sole bread-winner type of person, and I would inevitably be dissapointed in a cheap model. I probably just won't get one. Maybe one day when I hit the jackpot, but for the price of a crappy car...

 

Thanks again everyone. I'll continue enjoying listening to these beautiful things!

 

How about a harmonica? Similar free-reed type sound, and you can buy a decent one for a lot less than a good concertina.

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11 hours ago, melas0nos said:

Thank you all for the consideration.

 

I thought more of this. Considering I am a paycheck-to-paycheck kind / sole bread-winner type of person, and I would inevitably be dissapointed in a cheap model. I probably just won't get one. Maybe one day when I hit the jackpot, but for the price of a crappy car...

 

Thanks again everyone. I'll continue enjoying listening to these beautiful things!

Glad to know that my suggestion helped you make up your mind on what to do and what not to do.

Listening to good perfomances would always be a good idea. Enjoy!
When you win a Jackpot, go for Jeffries! :) 

Edited by gtotani
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Hi

Rather than nothing I would acquire an inexpensive 20 button concertina. I have had a number of Scholer type, German instruments and they can be a fun and inexpensive way to start, or just have a cool cheap concertina.

 

Here is one listed for less than $100.:

 

https://www.ylosdn.com/vintage-scholer-concertina-accordion-20-button-vintage-squeeze-box

 

No need to give up.

 

Richard

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Hello !

If the choice is only between Swan or Lachenal, I would pick a Lachenal because it holds is value, richer and sweeter sound, a pleasure to play and not made in China.

30b are much more expensive than 20b...(mainly because supply and demand !!).

So I would take a 20b to learn on and you will have a better idea of what to look for on the second 30b Lachenal (or other).

If you choose a Swan, buy it second hand !

Nicolas

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Quote

This site gives off strong scam vibes to me. I wouldn't buy anything there. Reverse image searches on the concertinas listed there all bring up unrelated listings elsewhere.

Edited by lordzedd
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On 9/14/2021 at 3:28 PM, melas0nos said:

... it seems like a Swan from McNeely or a 30 button Lachenal is what I'm looking at. Although I would have to wait longer for the Lachenal unless a great deal came along.

 

In fact you could buy a 26-key, mahogany-ended, Lachenal, with steel reeds (not the brass-reeded version) for LESS than the price of a new 30-key Swan. The 26-key ones have more than enough buttons for most players, and sell for a lot less than the price of a 30-key.

 

Here's an example for sale by Barleycorn Concertinas: https://concertina.co.uk/stock-selection/anglo-concertinas/lachenal-26-key-anglo-in-c-g-with-steel-reeds/

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Hmm. I do like the look of that Lachenal. However, my end goal is to be able to play classical like Bach. You guys ...damnit now I'm considering it again. I might try to go to a music shop in Northern CA and try one before commiting. I just live in the middle of no where so it would be a trek.

 

I do have a cheap Bayan on it's way. Maybe I'll have an idea if I like the squeezy squeezy stuff after I give it a go at least

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41 minutes ago, melas0nos said:

Hmm. I do like the look of that Lachenal. However, my end goal is to be able to play classical like Bach. You guys ...damnit now I'm considering it again. I might try to go to a music shop in Northern CA and try one before commiting. I just live in the middle of no where so it would be a trek.

 

I do have a cheap Bayan on it's way. Maybe I'll have an idea if I like the squeezy squeezy stuff after I give it a go at least

 

If you want to play classical music, you might consider an English or possibly a duet concertina rather than an Anglo.  You can get a much better vintage concertina for the price if you stay away from Anglos.

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9 hours ago, Daniel Hersh said:

 

If you want to play classical music, you might consider an English or possibly a duet concertina rather than an Anglo.  You can get a much better vintage concertina for the price if you stay away from Anglos.

I agree. That is what Wim Wakker suggested. 

However there are several outstanding performance of Bach played on an Anglo.

Very few can reach up to this level. 

 

 

Edited by gtotani
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To play Bach, choose the Swan 🙂

Probably with Wheatstone layout...

Faster than a budget Lachenal, modern sound.

But yes a English concertina seem more appropriate or a duet, check this : 

 

Nicolas

Edited by papawemba
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