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Different Lachenal Anglo models, basic to highest quality models


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Hello

 

I understand that Lachenal made a range of different Anglo models, from the basic to the top quality models, that were offered in their catalogs.

 

Can someone elucidate the different models specifically.

 

I believe the best Anglos had the inset metal ends for example.  (correct ???)

I believe also that the most basic were the mahogany ended with the simple cut out pattern. (correct ???)

 

I have tried to find a catalog  online and cannot find one with all the models listed.

 

So can someone please spell out these different models and their attributes for me. And if someone has a link to an old catalog with these models listed that would be of interest too.

 

Thanks,

 

Richard

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for that information.

 

I have seen that price list. 

Does there exist an illustrated list of each model?

I'm interested in seeing the "Newly Improved", "Special Model", and the New Model Anglo" and compare them. 

 

Are there any articles that describe the technical differences in the materials used and the type of skilled labor that was designated for each model. How quantifiable was the quality difference between Anglo models?

 

I sure would love to try an Edeophone Anglo, or even just hear one.

 

Edited by richard
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11 hours ago, Stephen Chambers said:

All the regular models were listed in the 1930 Price List, though a tiny handful of 12-sided Edeophone Anglos were also made (but only to special order).

 

http://www.concertina.com/pricelists/lachenal/Lachenal-Pricelist-All-c1930.pdf

That shows a remarkable difference in the prices of different grades for the same numbers of keys; but I suppose the same could be said for the various grades of new Anglos being made nowadays.

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On 8/16/2021 at 8:54 PM, richard said:

I understand that Lachenal made a range of different Anglo models, from the basic to the top quality models, that were offered in their catalogs.

 

Can someone elucidate the different models specifically.

 

Actually, over the years, there were other models/variations made that aren't in any Price List, either for sale by dealers or as special orders, and even some of the catalogue models could do with some explanation:

 

  1. Mahogany ends, simple spindle-cut frets, steel end-bolts, brass reeds.
  2. Mahogany ends, simple spindle-cut frets, steel end-bolts, steel reeds.
  3. Mahogany ends, full spindle-cut frets, brass end-bolts, steel reeds, usually made for dealers.
  4. Rosewood veneered ends, simple spindle-cut frets, steel bolts, steel reeds.
  5. Same as #2 but with to-the-edge metal ends.
  6. Same as #3 but with to-the-edge metal ends.

  7. Newly Improved, rosewood veneered ends, hand-cut full fretwork, brass end-bolts, steel reeds. (Also available in 5 1/8" "miniature" format.)

  8. Same as #7 but with to-the-edge metal ends.
  9. Same as #7 but with ebonised ends, nickel bolts.
  10. Same as #9 but with metal buttons.
  11. Same as #9 but with inset metal ends.
  12. Same as #11 but with metal buttons.
  13. Special Anglo Model, Lachenal's Jeffries/Crabb style model, with parallel reed chambers.
  14. New Model, same as #12 but with raised ends and long-scale reeds.
  15. Edeophone.

 

Edited by Stephen Chambers
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5 hours ago, Stephen Chambers said:

.........

11. Same as #10 but with metal buttons.

.........

 

Stephen,

do you mean that that the models 1 to 10 all have bone buttons?

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2 hours ago, Leonard said:

Stephen,

do you mean that that the models 1 to 10 all have bone buttons?

I don't think you should interpret the numbers on Stephen's list as 'model' numbers, just an attempt to list most of the model variations known as simply as possible.

 

If you look at that price list again you'll find that all the basic models were supplied with bone buttons, but solid Nickel Buttons (sometimes called German Silver) are available as an option on 'Newly Improved' types ( 'Newly Improved' being a phrase Lachenal used from the beginning of anglo production circa 1863). The Special Model anglo has nickel buttons as standard and the New Model Anglo is supplied with 'Silver Tipped' buttons where only the visible ends are metal.

 

But of course, we should remember that Lachenal were always willing to supply instruments to variations in customer requirements.

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45 minutes ago, wes williams said:

If you look at that price list again you'll find that all the basic models were supplied with bone buttons, but solid Nickel Buttons (sometimes called German Silver) are available as an option on 'Newly Improved' types ( 'Newly Improved' being a phrase Lachenal used from the beginning of anglo production circa 1863). The Special Model anglo has nickel buttons as standard and the New Model Anglo is supplied with 'Silver Tipped' buttons where only the visible ends are metal.

 

I think 'silver tipped' probably means the ones where the main body of the button is turned from nickel silver/German silver rod, and they have a thin disc of real silver soldered on top. A common fault is the disc falls off revealing an open tube.

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8 hours ago, richard said:

Further: What distinguished Lachenal's best reeds, and which models got those?

 

Lachenal's best reeds were the Crabb-style ones (probably made by Charles Crabb's family) in the Special Anglo Model, and the long-scale ones in the New Model and Edeophone.

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On 8/16/2021 at 9:58 PM, Stephen Chambers said:

 

Quote

I sure would love to try an Edeophone Anglo, or even just hear one.

 

Me too. I believe they were all made in D/A tuning.

 

 

Then there are the twelve-sided Wheatstones (anglo and duet IIRC) in the article by Wayne, Birley, Gaskins here. I guess they discounted the idea that these were made from Lachenal parts so they don't count as Lachenals anyway.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/17/2021 at 11:09 PM, Stephen Chambers said:

 

Actually, over the years, there were other models/variations made that aren't in any Price List, either for sale by dealers or as special orders, and even some of the catalogue models could do with some explanation:

 

  1. Mahogany ends, simple spindle-cut frets, steel end-bolts, brass reeds.
  2. Mahogany ends, simple spindle-cut frets, steel end-bolts, steel reeds.
  3. Mahogany ends, full spindle-cut frets, brass end-bolts, steel reeds, usually made for dealers.
  4. Rosewood veneered ends, simple spindle-cut frets, steel bolts, steel reeds.
  5. Same as #2 but with to-the-edge metal ends.
  6. Same as #3 but with to-the-edge metal ends.

  7. Newly Improved, rosewood veneered ends, hand-cut full fretwork, brass end-bolts, steel reeds. (Also available in 5 1/8" "miniature" format.)

  8. Same as #7 but with to-the-edge metal ends.
  9. Same as #7 but with ebonised ends, nickel bolts.
  10. Same as #9 but with metal buttons.
  11. Same as #9 but with inset metal ends.
  12. Same as #11 but with metal buttons.
  13. Special Anglo Model, Lachenal's Jeffries/Crabb style model, with parallel reed chambers.
  14. New Model, same as #12 but with raised ends and long-scale reeds.
  15. Edeophone.

 

 

Stephen--

 

This is very informative!  A question: I have heard people say that  #11 (Newly Improved with inset metal ends) are better concertinas than your #8 (Newly Improved with to-the-edge metal ends).  Have you found that to be the case?  I realize that Lachenal reed quality can vary quite a bit even within each model.

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Are the New Models considered equal to or better than the edeophone? In terms of reeds, action and sound?

 

 

I know there is a difference in the sides. And possibly aesthetics. But as far as action and sound? We’re the better people working exclusively on the edeophone. So even if the action and reads are equal, the edeophones just were better?

 

 

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On 8/19/2021 at 2:11 AM, Ken_Coles said:

Then there are the twelve-sided Wheatstones (anglo and duet IIRC) in the article by Wayne, Birley, Gaskins here. I guess they discounted the idea that these were made from Lachenal parts so they don't count as Lachenals anyway.

 

I wouldn't altogether agree with that conclusion though Ken. It may be true for the large 1938 duet #35074 that is the main subject of that 2001 paper (A Wheatstone Twelve-Sided ‘Edeophone’ Concertina with Pre-MacCann Chromatic Duet Fingering) which assumed that Lachenal's was taken over by Wheatstone's in 1935, but in my 2004 paper (Some Notes on Lachenal Concertina Production and Serial Numbers) I pointed out compelling evidence (from the Wheatstone Ledgers) that Wheatstone's were already re-badging (and/or finishing off?) Lachenal instruments, and using their innovative plastic button material (Erinoid) too, as early as September 1933 - so at least some of the "Wheatstone Edeophones" (and especially the 1934 Edeophone anglos in question) could have started off as being unfinished instruments from the Lachenal factory.

 

Wheatstone's certainly did do that because I've seen, and even owned, some of them - including a Lachenal amboyna-wood piccolo anglo, with Wheatstone reeds and badges, that my late friend Paul Davies found at the Chor Bazaar in Mumbai, India.

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On 8/27/2021 at 10:54 PM, seanc said:

Are the New Models considered equal to or better than the edeophone? In terms of reeds, action and sound?

 

I know there is a difference in the sides. And possibly aesthetics. But as far as action and sound? We’re the better people working exclusively on the edeophone. So even if the action and reads are equal, the edeophones just were better?

 

New Model anglos are extremely rare (I've only ever had one of them in more than 50 years), whilst Edeophone ones are as rare as hen's teeth (I've never seen one)! I doubt if there's anybody who has seen examples of both, let alone had the good fortune to play examples of them.

 

But, normally speaking (in terms of English concertinas) the ebony-finished New Models are of the same sort of quality as Edeophones.

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1 hour ago, Stephen Chambers said:

 I doubt if there's anybody who has seen examples of both, let alone had the good fortune to play examples of them.

 

 

Never say never.  I had the luck to find an "Edeo Anglo" at a backyard auction #33301.  (Apparently a few where bought in the Cincinnati, OH area.  Grey Larsen found two others!)  40b hook and arm action and a very even sound.  

 

The late Cindy Mayti of the Cincinnati Irish band, "Silver Arm" played a 40b New Model anglo which was/is a very nice instrument.

 

FWIW I think New Models are under rated.  Very nice Lachenal sound (that says "vintage concertina" to me)

and in most cases very good response.  with a bit of time and care the hook and arm action can usually be set up for a pleasant playing touch.

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44 minutes ago, Greg Jowaisas said:

Never say never.  I had the luck to find an "Edeo Anglo" at a backyard auction #33301.  (Apparently a few where bought in the Cincinnati, OH area.  Grey Larsen found two others!)  40b hook and arm action and a very even sound.  

 

The late Cindy Mayti of the Cincinnati Irish band, "Silver Arm" played a 40b New Model anglo which was/is a very nice instrument.

 

FWIW I think New Models are under rated.  Very nice Lachenal sound (that says "vintage concertina" to me)

and in most cases very good response.  with a bit of time and care the hook and arm action can usually be set up for a pleasant playing touch.

 

Greg, knowing about #33301, I did wonder if you might have come across a New Model too, but you're probably "the exception that proves the rule"...

 

It seems there were four of them that Wheatstone's delivered to Cincinatti, so there's only #33305 to find now!

 

Whilst the "hook action" goes to confirm that they were, indeed, originally made by Lachenal's.

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