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Repair before selling?


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My Wheatstone English Treble (made 1927) needs some work to be fully playable. All reeds sound nicely, but it leaks somewhat (new pads perhaps?) and could be tuned to modern 440. Doesn't need a full restoration. I have been thinking of selling it. Would it be best to have the work done first or sell as-is?  Still...I should keep it. 

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Sell it as is would be my advice.  Anyone who is any good at repair work will have a lengthy waiting list, and tuning from old pitch to 440 needs someone with experience and a skilled hand with a file.  Potential buyers will likely have their own preferences about who they trust to do the work.

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Posted (edited)

That is my feeling. If I have it repaired it would be to keep it.  Thanks. I have an excellent repair shop that estimates only 3 weeks for the work.  The Button Box says 3 months plus time for repair.

Edited by Everett
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On 7/1/2021 at 8:18 AM, Everett said:

My Wheatstone English Treble (made 1927) needs some work to be fully playable. All reeds sound nicely, but it leaks somewhat (new pads perhaps?) and could be tuned to modern 440. Doesn't need a full restoration. I have been thinking of selling it. Would it be best to have the work done first or sell as-is?  Still...I should keep it. 

If I were going to buy I’d would want the work done prior to buying.   I guess a lot of it depends upon your level of sophistication and understanding what the issue is, trust in the individual you’re buying it etc

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I agree. I have thought about what I would like and dislike. I prefer a repaired instrument over one that needs work unless it is a very good bargain.  I purchased the Wheatstone for a very nice price with lots of room for repair. It plays very well, but loses too much air (about 15-18 sec bellows stretch-out). Could be something as simple as the air valve itself. I am planning on sending off to a master repairman Chad Walker who I know from when he was in Austin (now in Wisconsin). He can handle all free reed instruments.  I contacted Button Box and they have a 3 month waiting list. Other repairmen suggestions are welcome.    

I play button accordion, penny whistle, mandolin, tenor guitar. I have always been interested in concertina though (and always up for learning a new instrument). 

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Repairing and tuning a traditional concertina is very different to an accordion or melodion. Especially the techniques around tuning adjustment and reed work. Accordion repairers use scrapers, or dremel type grinders. This sort of approach can do significant and irrecoverable harm to a concertina reed. the valve leathers and shapes are different, I could go on. I don't know the chap you mentioned, and I am sure he is a fine craftsman, however do check that he is also a concertina specialist and knows his way around a traditional instrument. The phrase you use is 'all free reed instruments' this worries me on your behalf.

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These concerns are one thing that keeps me from sending it off. I may just wait till one of the excellent concertina specialists has an opening. I'm on the list for Button Box. Is there anyone in Texas or the vicinity?

 

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47 minutes ago, Everett said:

These concerns are one thing that keeps me from sending it off. I may just wait till one of the excellent concertina specialists has an opening. I'm on the list for Button Box. Is there anyone in Texas or the vicinity?

 

Hi where are you located in Texas? Have you tried Greg Jowaisas.?   He is excellent but that’s all good concertina specialist does have a waiting he is located in Kentucky.

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Greg is very good. However your first choice may also be good too, have you talked to him about his materials and how he tunes reeds< what tuning tolerance does he work to? If he says +/- 0 cents, then forget it. 

 

 

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My first choice, Chad Walker is a certified technician specializing in tuning, fine-machine ... He is a graduate of the Accordion-Concertina Repair and Technician's School.    He has been practicing at least 10. years.

 

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