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Why should I upgrade?


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I have a rochelle concertina because I didn't have thousands to spend on a high end instrument and I am a beginner.  I researched for awhile for a good starter concertina and everywhere I looked I was told that the rochelle was the best cheaper starter concertina because its not just a starter concertina and it can do anything that a high end concertina can do.  So mu question is, why should I upgrade in the future? What makes a wakker concertina $2000 more than my current one? 

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Keagan, the Rochelle will do you well for a while but will eventually be limiting. As in anything, you get what you pay for and a more expensive instrument will be better in all ways. The bellows will be smoother and easier, the reeds will sound richer and will speak more easily and the action will feel better. It will also be more durable and will hold its value. I infer from your post that you have not encountered any other concertinas; when you do have a chance to try higher quality instruments you will readily appreciate the differences. The better tinas are not overpriced even though they are a lot of money. You can get a reasonable guitar quite cheaply these days but that is because of the volume of sales; quality concertinas are a niche market with low production volume so economies of scale do not apply.

 

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Good advice from Dick T .

I think it depends on how far you want to go with the instrument,my third concertina was and still is a Jeffries CG Anglo that I thought was very expensive at the time.I traded in my Jones Anglo for the Jeffries at £125 which I worried about. I have never regretted taking the plunge and the reasons have already been mentioned ,but mainly I had reached the limitations of the instrument. I was playing faster than the instrument could play. There is however a long way you can go with a cheaper concertina my first being a Hohner CG that cost me ten pounds. I learnt a lot from playing that instrument and enjoyed a few seasons with the Broadwood Morris Men playing it ,but there comes a time and you know when you get there that an upgrade will assist you to proceed to the next level. A larger investment, but there are few players that regret making the step up .Those that do regret it are not committed to the instrument and that is for the player to decide.

Al

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[OK, duplicate threads and I replied to the wrong one. Have merged them]

 

Where are you located? Maybe we can find a nearby member with a better-grade instrument you can try. Then you'll know the difference.

 

Ken

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Hi

I think if you are playing an instrument that you enjoy playing and pleases you profoundly in all the aesthetic categories (playability, tone, volume, visual look) than you have a right to be content.

 

Trying out other makes of instruments can be fun and if you are not careful set you up for some developing dissatisfaction with your current instrument if it does not compare favorably. 

 

Something that is wonderful about concertinas for me it is a man-made object that can  truly thrill and gratify, unlike so many consumer items and mass produced products. When ever I pick up one of my treasured instruments( each with its own character and magic) I am thrilled and delighted. Not many "things" in this life can do this. I think that whatever instrument you are playing that should be the goal, whatever anybody else says.

 

Richard

Edited by richard
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When I upgraded from a Rochelle, I think the most immediate difference I felt was the lack of resistance. With the Rochelle, I did feel like I was having to push and pull the ends to get a sound. In comparison to that, the more expensive instrument practically felt like it had no bellows at all, and I was playing "air concertina" - it was just that smooth. I think part of that was that the Rochelle is a bit bulky - 7 1/2 inches across rather than the more usual 6 1/2 - and I think part of it is the cheaper bellows.

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I take every opportunity to play any Anglo that I come across.  When you've played a few, you will know.

 

I had a Rochelle.  It did the job.  I upgraded to a Marcus within 3–6 months of buying it.  Since then I've upgraded again.

 

An upgrade gets you a smoother and faster action, a nicer tone, reeds that respond more quickly, bellows that feel smoother, materials that resonate differently and improve the sound, and an instrument that feels better balanced and nicer in your hands.  Also, of course, better boxes look nicer.

 

It's not always logical.  I have a 20b Lachenal which is "cheap and cheerful" with clickity buttons.  I went to Barleycorn and tried 6 or 7 "identical" instruments and knew very quickly that this was the one that I wanted.  It was not necessarily the "best" but it was the one that felt and sounded right to me.

 

No rush to upgrade, but try to find opportunities to play other boxes whenever possible and sooner or later you will know what you want.

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I had a McNeela Wren last year and it was OK for a starter instrument. Because it was a cheap beginner instrument, I had to "work" to play it. My arms would be sore after an hour. It used up a lot of air and I was always using the air button. I now have a Seth Hamon Herrington which is a lot more expensive than the Wren and worth every penny. The Herrington practically plays itself. All I do is guide the ends and lightly press the buttons. It is sooooo smooth and easy to play. You get what you pay for and this is true with other instruments as well. I learned this when I used to play C#D accordion. There is a big difference in quality of construction, sound and playability. I'm glad you like your Rochelle and wish you well with it. Eventually you will want to trade up to the Clover, Herrington or Morse Ceili, or something in the same bracket. Good luck and keep squeezin'.👍

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