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Any thoughts on what this might be?


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This is currently listed on a local on-line auction.  The only description is "Civil War era Squeeze Box".  Maybe a bodged Lachenal?  But 11 fold bellows?

concertina.jpeg

conc.2.jpeg

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8 hours ago, Daniel Hersh said:

I am not sure, but the ends look a bit like the ones on lower-end Crabbs made from about the 1930s through 1950s.

 

I disagree; the low-end Crabb end plates are simple but elegant and crisply cut, obviously the work of a skilled professional. This one has a very crude amateur feel.

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3 hours ago, Little John said:

I'm no expert, but I was under the impression South African instruments often have ten or so folds. Could that be its origin?

I wondered about that.  I was under the impression that the "English" (i.e. not German) instruments there were all Wheatstones, but found an earlier thread here that talks about Lachenals pre-1900.  Those bellows look like original factory equipment- was Lachenal doing this sort of custom/export work?  Had the Boer style of playing evolved to the degree that there would have been a market for extended bellows? 

Edited by Bill N
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9 hours ago, Bill N said:

I was under the impression that the "English" (i.e. not German) instruments there were all Wheatstones, but found an earlier thread here that talks about Lachenals pre-1900.  

 

Lachenal's were probably sending them to South Africa until they closed down in 1933 (and were taken over by Wheatstone's), thereafter there was only Crabb's and Wheatstone's (on a much bigger scale) to supply the market.

 

Quote

Those bellows look like original factory equipment- was Lachenal doing this sort of custom/export work?  Had the Boer style of playing evolved to the degree that there would have been a market for extended bellows?

 The extended bellows were replacements that were made later in South Africa, the concertinas would have left their makers, in England, with only 5-, or 6-fold, bellows.

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