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What are your preferred buttons


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Hello everyone I have a concertina I like very much however  there it raised metal buttons that are hard on the fingers at least mine. Concertina is on the way to Greg  J  and I am wanting to change the buttons.  I’m asking all your expert opinions.  Does one type over the other  allow for quick movement/playing. .So my question is this what type of concertina button do you all prefer?  I also have an 1865 Horriman tutor with concave bone buttons that I love. The picture of the Wheatstone that I am considering having the buttons change is attached. I look forward to hearing from you all 

Thank you

Stephen

9D14C024-64B4-48E2-BF91-F764DD32A288.jpeg

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I really like the domed delrin ones on the Morse Geordie. Also the similar shaped metal ones on my Wheatstones.

I didnt like the feel of the flat -ish silver/ nickel buttons on some Lachenals. However I do quite like the small flat -ish bone buttons on a Lachenal tutor. They are very worn and quite rounded at the edges.

I tend to hit the buttons hard, so that's probably why I like them to be well rounded.

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I find that flat topped keys are less comfortable to play than the rounded ended keys.

 

However I would be loathe to switch a set of keys on a 'vintage'  instrument Whilst I have no doubt that Greg is a top class craftsman and has extensive knowledge, there are a lot of variables on a set of keys, and in between keys within a single set. Don't forget that keys were not made with a CNC controller. within a single set you get differences in diameters, guide peg length, distance between the foot of the key and the centre line of the cross drilling. Even the cross drilling being off centre. 

 

Recently I had to sort out an instrument that had a 'new' set of keys fitted, they were not a bad substitute, but many kept sticking due to odd misalignment issues and the fact that the clearance between the guide peg and the guide peg hole, combined with the clearance between the fingerplate bushing and the key bushings dis not allow for a free movement along the full length of the key stroke.

 

There is the also the thought that you are significantly taking the concertina off the original manufacturing standard debasing it into some form of mixed oddity. For some this is a lesser consideration, but it is never-the-less important. once the replacement keys are fitted, it may not be an easy job the revert to the originals.

 

Dave

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56 minutes ago, d.elliott said:

I find that flat topped keys are less comfortable to play than the rounded ended keys.

 

However I would be loathe to switch a set of keys on a 'vintage'  instrument Whilst I have no doubt that Greg is a top class craftsman and has extensive knowledge, there are a lot of variables on a set of keys, and in between keys within a single set. Don't forget that keys were not made with a CNC controller. within a single set you get differences in diameters, guide peg length, distance between the foot of the key and the centre line of the cross drilling. Even the cross drilling being off centre. 

 

Recently I had to sort out an instrument that had a 'new' set of keys fitted, they were not a bad substitute, but many kept sticking due to odd misalignment issues and the fact that the clearance between the guide peg and the guide peg hole, combined with the clearance between the fingerplate bushing and the key bushings dis not allow for a free movement along the full length of the key stroke.

 

There is the also the thought that you are significantly taking the concertina off the original manufacturing standard debasing it into some form of mixed oddity. For some this is a lesser consideration, but it is never-the-less important. once the replacement keys are fitted, it may not be an easy job the revert to the originals.

 

Dave

Thank you Dave I value your expert opinion and certainly thought along those lines.Thank you Dave I value your expert opinion and certainly thought along those lines

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1 hour ago, simon ds said:

5E2F4482-7E99-44D5-9DC1-7A361B3B6EB4.pngj

 

-the smooth buttons on this concertina app. are helping me to think about spacings!

Interesting what concertina app is this? Thank youInteresting what concertina app is this? Thank you

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1 hour ago, StephenTx said:

Interesting what concertina app is this? Thank youInteresting what concertina app is this? Thank you

It’s the English concertina app from AppCordions on iPhone, probably Androids too. It’s actually pretty good.

 I’m still looking for an English concertina to fix up so I’ve  learned the English keyboard layout from this app. Difficult at first, lots of conscious  effort because there’s only audio feedback on finger placement accuracy, but it will be easier once I get onto the real thing.

 

A concave button may allow more nerve endings of the finger to be in contact with the button while at rest, maybe that’s a factor with getting a mental image and centering on the finger board?

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>> lots of conscious effort because there’s only audio feedback on finger placement accuracy,...

 

COVID-19 era - masks are the "in" thing. 🙂

 

Also fixes the issue of "finger placement accuracy."  😎

 

 

ConcertinaMask_2.JPG

 

ConcertinaMask_1.JPG

Edited by pentaprism
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3 hours ago, Richard Mellish said:

I find it counterintuitive that a convex end should be more comfortable than a flat one. I suspect that the disadvantage of the flat end is the sharp edge. Perhaps the ideal would be a slightly concave centre combined with a rounded edge.

I could understandI itbeening counter intuitive here is a picture of my 1854 wheat stone baritone buttons which obviously bone they do have a slight concave but they are Smooth on the ends perhaps from 167 years of the news 🙂. I don’t have the problem when playing her versus the one with the metal bands that are in the previous picture

A1C29B66-F83F-472F-91CA-D42DE1C6F0D2.jpeg

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  • 4 months later...

Hi Sean,

 

 i think you may have hit on your own answer here.  I have got used to Jeffries metal, domed buttons over the years and find them easiest of all, despite the reduction in diameter

On 2/16/2021 at 4:57 PM, seanc said:

So far.. I have had: plastic, bone (flat) and metal, both flat and domed.

 

I prefer the domed metal.

 

I have tried delrin think it is nice. 

 

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My early C. Jeffries anglo has bon button which I would describe as somewhere between a dome head and an pan head. ie the central area has a gentle dome, with edges being rounded off. Many od these would appear to have worn a bit over the years. I find these very comfortable.

I also have an old starter model 20 key lachenal with plastic/bone buttons, shaped much like the OP's metal ones. I don't mind these too much, but they are nowhere near as comfortable as the above.

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