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Concertina storage.


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As i write this, its Christmas Eve. Bit no matter when you may read this, a fair Christmas to you all from the Firbolg and the Orc.

 

My novice question for you all is this: how does one properly store a concertina that doesnt have the bellow strap? One of the models im looking at lacks it and only comes with a padded bag. I know you should always store the instrument not on either face, but how do you remove it from the bag without stressing the bellows when its not strapped shut? Apologies if this seems an obvious question.

 

Regards,

The Firbolg

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Don is quite right, though the strap is more to keep the bellows from opening up somewhat on it’s own and needing more pressure on the press notes when nearing more closed than the resting state.  A hard case with corner blocks eliminates the need for a strap and provides vastly more protection to your possibly expensive instrument.  You aren’t likely to over-stress the bellows taking it out of the bag unless the bag is too small.  If you haven’t bought the concertina yet, spring for a hard case with it.  If the cost of the case is a good portion of the price, you are likely to want a better instrument soon anyway, so you can start squirreling away money for a case worthy instrument.

Dana

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On 12/24/2020 at 9:09 AM, FirbolgNorc said:

how do you remove it from the bag without stressing the bellows when its not strapped shut?

It is easy to safely take a Rochelle out of its bag by unzipping the top, putting your hand through the strap and then inverting everything so that the hand in the strap is at the bottom.  Then simply pull the bag up and off the concertina.  The bag is loose enough that the bellows are not stretched out when you remove the bag.

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On 12/24/2020 at 9:09 AM, FirbolgNorc said:

I know you should always store the instrument not on either face...

 

The reason for storing the concertina “not on either face” is to avoid the flap valves hanging away from the reed pan and therefore developing a natural curve that holds them away from the reed pan in playing position. This, of course, is only a concern in instruments that have reed pans parallel to the ends. Stagis and Bastaris don’t. The reeds are in harmonica-like structures inside the instrument, perpendicular to the ends. I suspect (from the shape of the ends of the bellows) that Rochelles don’t either, but I don’t know for sure (I’ve never looked inside one).

Edited by David Barnert
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This discussion raises a question I had never thought about. Why is it that melodeons and accordeons generally have straps to hold the bellows closed but concertinas generally don't? (There may be exceptions in both cases.) Is it just that melodeons and accordeons are more unwieldy, and would become even more so if they weren't kept closed?

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5 hours ago, Richard Mellish said:

This discussion raises a question I had never thought about. Why is it that melodeons and accordeons generally have straps to hold the bellows closed but concertinas generally don't? (There may be exceptions in both cases.) Is it just that melodeons and accordeons are more unwieldy, and would become even more so if they weren't kept closed?

 

I assume it's because most good concertinas reside in blocked cases that keep the bellows firmly closed.

 

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