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U(E)CO Unidentified (English) Concertina Object


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Hello everybody,

 

Does anyone recognise this instrument? And knows what type it is? Which company could have made it?

There is nothing on it at all. No name, nothing.

Thank you in advance, I am very curious.

 

Maarten

 

concertina 1.JPG

concertina 2.JPG

concertina 3.JPG

Concertina 4.jpg

Concertina 5.jpg

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In any case, the 'thing' aroused my enthusiasm for the concertina. The next step, of course, will be a real buy. Tips, advice, interesting sites/links?That leaves no room for doubt.........

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10 minutes ago, Maarten said:

In any case, the 'thing' aroused my enthusiasm for the concertina. The next step, of course, will be a real buy. Tips, advice, interesting sites/links?That leaves no room for doubt.........

 

Very fine since it has prompted you to take up the concertina - as to "room for doubt", I reckon nobody here would leave any; at best it will be good enough to serve you for, say, another year... - get a vintage instrument, preferably a Wheatstone with metal buttons (as the bellows will suply you with sufficient air, and the metal buttons would indicate a better make) - of course, if and only if the instrument is (or can be transformed into) good shape...

 

Feel free to ask - best wishes, 🐺

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And this one? https://mcneelamusic.com/concertinas/new-the-sparrow-english-concertina-sold-out/ 

 

or

 

http://www.concertinaconnection.com/jackie-jack.htm

 

I think my instrument is a Bonetti: https://www.ebay.com/itm/333375025182 

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Hi Maarten, both the instruments you linked are big steps up from the Bonetti/Cheapo Generic Concertina, but are definitely still beginner instruments. There are a number of threads on the site about them, I find it useful to go on Google and type "site:concertina.net [SEARCH TERM]" and it'll search all the forum threads about it much better than the site's software can.

 

I've gone up the whole upgrade path from Rochelle -> Minstrel -> Clover on the Anglo side. The Rochelle was nice to start on compared to what I came from, similar to yours, but I moved on from it quickly.

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re the Jackie - there's some room for doubt here since some will say go for it and some (including myself) will say you shouldn't - it's in fact debatable, I really love the feel and sound of traditional ("vintage") concertinas, and luckily there are some makers - such as @alex_holden - who are currently making instruments in that style (as opposed to using accordion reeds asf.) to the entire satisfaction of their customers - of course you might go for one of those, but if you're after a regular English treble, it would be easier to find an instrument about 100 years old like so many of us.

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Maarten,

 

As a professional player in another field you will know that a cheap instrument will hold you back. A good vintage concertina will be much better to play; it will sound better and will feel better. A vintage concertina bought from a good source at a fair price will hold its value so your risk of financial loss would be a lot less should you not keep it up. My advice is always to spend as much as you can afford and avoid cheap learners instruments at all costs. Do not be frightened of old concertinas, mine are 97 and 120 years old; how old are Strads? 

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3 hours ago, Wolf Molkentin said:

 it would be easier to find an instrument about 100 years old like so many of us.

You look quite a bit younger than that!....😉

 

I would add aesthetic appeal and fixability to the plus column.  A vintage instrument seduces and demands playing and upkeep.  Would you spend twice what you paid for her in repairs if she goes wonky?

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Problem: I live in Holland. A country where the concertina is a rarity. 

As a professional clarinet player I know that there are great second hand instruments for my students. I always advise them to test such an instrument carefully and, in case of doubt, not to buy it. Look for another one. There are plenty of them. Unfortunately, this is not the case here for a concertina. This makes the purchase of a vintage instrument almost impossible. And a trip to the UK at the moment is not something you can do just as easily.

Help! Does anyone have a great vintage instrument for sale for me? 😃

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Suppose I keep practicing on a cheap instrument for another year.... Can anyone say anything meaningful about this one?

https://mcneelamusic.com/concertinas/new-the-sparrow-english-concertina-lead-time/

 

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Maarten, apart from Brexit (which may complicate things considerably) there are some reliable dealers in the UK which would be willing to send you an instrument for a week or so in order to try it and make up your mind, such as (in chronological order re my personal experiences, and as well the quantity of instrument I bought from them):

 

Chris Algar / Barleycorn Concertinas

A. C. Norman

David Robertson

 

In my experience, there would be a pretty good chance that you'd be happy to buy and keep (and then play) the instrument of your choice...

 

Best wishes - 🐺

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