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1942 Aeola 4E for sale in a Vancouver pawn shop


Don Taylor
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  • 2 weeks later...

I purchased this concertina after a lot of back and forth and then a sudden advertised price drop and a late night phone call to me accepting my initial offer.  A local one family instrument which doesn’t come up often in my area so I’m glad it worked out.  Very clean, no rust, no warping, air tight 8-fold bellows, wrist straps, air button, red baffles, nickel plated ends.  Case is pristine except for broken leather hinge.  There is no signs that it has ever been repaired or touched inside.  It came with a small spare parts kit including 4 each of those long pinky rest and thumb strap screws I can never find. Oh the little things that make me happy! 🤔  I was surprised to find it in factory A440 concert pitch.  It has pristine brass shoe, steel reeds... metal capped, plastic buttons and with an interesting hook action that is not like any Lachenal I’ve ever come across.  It is already coming to life with almost perfect tuning and amazing loud/soft dynamics.  Very expressive.

 

I let this one go but it came back to me and I’ m glad it did.

 

it would be interesting to know more about Wheatstone from 1939 to 1945 during the war years and also the transition to A440 concert pitch.  This is definitely a high quality superior instrument probably the best I’ve ever played and it is not even fully played in yet after sitting for decades.  

 

Journal lists it as a model 17 nickel ended 48 key English Aeola dated June 30, 1942.  35407 on the same page has the interesting note: “old tuning strument”

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Edited by 4to5to6
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Thanks Stephen.  You are right... this one completed fooled me.  Probably the debris in it.  Humbled again!  I spent all day working on it so it should be good for another 80 years now.  Just have to fix the case’s leather hinge. Thanks again.

Edited by 4to5to6
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4 hours ago, 4to5to6 said:

Thanks Stephen.  You are right... this one completed fooled me.  Probably the debris in it.  Humbled again!  I spent all day working on it so it should be good for another 80 years now.  Just have to fix the case’s leather hinge. Thanks again.

How much did you end up getting it forHow much did you end up getting it for

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Everyone of my concertinas has their stories...  This is probably going to be really boring to most so beware...

 

I completely let this one go as their original $3500 asking price was way too high and my original assessment of the instrument was that it was really poor with multiple notes sounding, etc. and I couldn't see inside and the war era, etc.  I felt that I’ve seen all this before so said forget it.  I made them what I thought was a fair offer based on c.net comments, etc. and that was the end of it.

 

Then a few weeks later there was all the sudden c.net interest so I went back last Saturday to volunteer to do some minor work on it in hopes of getting it working better and to take some photos of the inside to post.  I brought in my own instrument and took the end off to show them the process but they wouldn’t even let me see it again so went home disappointed and that was the end of it again.  I was a bit upset at their response and some comments they made but just let it go.

 

Monday afternoon I then get a few very low resolution photos of the inside from them with no comments.  They were obviously brave enough to take it apart themselves after my demonstration.  Good thing I explained how the screws shouldn’t be mixed up, etc.  I saw the reeds had brass shoes so that was one question answered.

 

Then... late Tuesday after 9:00 PM I get a short text accepting my original offer.  “The concertina is yours”.  At first I didn’t even know who it was and sent a quick text back but got no response.  Then I saw the email so phoned even though it was late.  

 

When I went in the next day after work they said they were getting multiple offers that never went anywhere so were done with it and all the games and just wanted a quick and simple cash sale.  They obviously had some negative experiences.  I took one end off to check it out and saw how clean it was so that was good enough for me.  It had a number of fouled reeds still so I couldn’t play it but no notes were continually sounding this time to my surprise.  I gave them the cash, put it in the trunk, then was off to the Salvation Army thrift store across before they closed to keep my wife happy.

 

All they would tell me about it's history was that it was purchased from a gentlemen in his early 60s who said it had always been in their family since new.

 

I paid really low for it but don’t want to say here in case I ever sell it again. After the events last week, I am sure that it will come back and bite me if I do.  Should I feel guilty especially after discovering it is in factory A440 modern pitch with untouched reeds?  The question I’ve thought about is what did the original owner get? I will most likely will never know but I’m sure the store made a good profit.

 

i spent all day yesterday working on it.  I’m not an expert but have a techie background and have done maybe 10 concertinas now over 7 years with no terrible results.  I know my limits but am comfortable with bringing them back to life, conditioning bellows, minor repairs, etc.  I don’t tune yet.  I rescue the strays even if no interest to me so I can fix them up with the intent to give them away (or at the most break even) to increase concertina awareness and  interest in my area.  I think I may just have to keep this one especially with it’s nearly perfect 8 fold bellows and clean inside with no warping and especially because I just love playing it with it’s superb dynamics and tone.

 

I am still curios to know more about the Wheatstone switch over to A440 and if it was actually 1939 and what was happening with them during the war if anyone has any info about this.

 

Photo attached of repaired air button with new bone guide pin.

F4B378CF-9CC0-468E-A148-36E6E8205C27.jpeg

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They accepted my offer me of $2000 Canadian However I did not pursue because of the evaluation that you had given calling it in Miserable condition which made me pull back. In addition the feedback I had gotten from the Concertina experts was that vintage of Aeola‘s was not top of the line although as one of our colleagues mentioned they could have been using some prewar parts.  I really didn’t need it as I got a fantastic deal a couple months ago on CNET of a 1958 Aeola extended 56 For $500 which was an excellent shape.

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Can’t we just keep this about the instrument and it’s history?  I am trying to be positive. They did tell me how a guy from Texas offered $2500, then $1500, then wanted free shipping, then wanted no tax, etc. etc.  One of the many stories.  It was all quite embarrassing to me as I’ve worked hard to promote the concertina in my area.  I’ve learned a lot of lessons through all this.  I really don’t want to talk about all the negative parts of this sale.  Believe me, I’ve had countless negative experiences with the concertina as a commodity.  I’m really surprised I made it sometimes when I was used so badly when new to it all.  I lost a lot.  It’s why I now fix up old low end instruments and give them away.

 

I hope they called me because they could see how passionate I am about the instrument.  They know they could of got a lot more online.

 

I’m done... It’s time to go play Beeswing and few other happy other up beat tunes on my new old gem.  Have to fix that one slightly leaking pad still.  I would rather discuss Sailor and the Mermaid by the Gothard Sisters.  I love the variations in this piece.  Wonderful!

 

 

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3 minutes ago, 4to5to6 said:

Can’t we just keep this about the instrument and it’s history?  I am trying to be positive. They did tell me how a guy from Texas offered $2500, then $1500, then wanted free shipping, then wanted no tax, etc. etc.  One of the many stories.  It was all quite embarrassing to me as I’ve worked hard to promote the concertina in my area.  I’ve learned a lot of lessons through all this.  I really don’t want to talk about all the negative parts of this sale.  Believe me, I’ve had countless negative experiences with the concertina as a commodity.  I’m really surprised I made it sometimes when I was used so badly when new to it all.  I lost a lot.  It’s why I now fix up old low end instruments and give them away.

 

I hope they called me because they could see how passionate I am about the instrument.  They know they could of got a lot more online.

 

I’m done... It’s time to go play Beeswing and few other happy other up beat tunes on my new old gem.  Have to fix that one slightly leaking pad still.  I would rather discuss Sailor and the Mermaid by the Gothard Sisters.  I love the variations in this piece.  Wonderful!

 

Yes that was was me they agreed Elto $2000 CAD and like any good pawn show dealer would have done I tried a lower bid. Part of the  fun is in the dealing! But considering your evaluation, I  really did not need (as I mentioned I have a similar vintage extended Aeola they wouldn’t go forgoing down from 2000 to 1500.  Happy you have it and nurturing yet as I really would have fixed it up to resell.This may have work to your advantage and I’m happy for you.

 

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