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Re-guilding Of Bellows Leather


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I don't know how I put this in 'history', but I'm reposting it in the correct place now -

 

I'm about to embark on a task that I haven't tried before - regilding bellows on a nice 30B Jones where there is wear in areas of the (still sound) bellows. Can anybody suggest a good guidance on doing this work? Gold pens from Tandy has been suggested.

Edited by Paul Read
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Hi Paul

My understanding is that regilding can be a pretty thankless task. This is apparently due to all of the residues which collect on and become ingrained in the leather during use including sweat, grease, nicotine, probably beer etc. Unless the leather is thoroughly cleaned, which I expect would not be an easy job in-situ, any new gilding applied will struggle to get an adequate key. I believe that gold-leaf is the traditional material used and is applied with some sort of blocking tool (Geoff Crabb or Bob Tedrow would tell you better). Don't know anything about gold pens from Tandy.

 

Pete

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Hi Paul

My understanding is that regilding can be a pretty thankless task. This is apparently due to all of the residues which collect on and become ingrained in the leather during use including sweat, grease, nicotine, probably beer etc. Unless the leather is thoroughly cleaned, which I expect would not be an easy job in-situ, any new gilding applied will struggle to get an adequate key. I believe that gold-leaf is the traditional material used and is applied with some sort of blocking tool (Geoff Crabb or Bob Tedrow would tell you better). Don't know anything about gold pens from Tandy.

 

Pete

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Hi Paul

My understanding is that regilding can be a pretty thankless task. This is apparently due to all of the residues which collect on and become ingrained in the leather during use including sweat, grease, nicotine, probably beer etc. Unless the leather is thoroughly cleaned, which I expect would not be an easy job in-situ, any new gilding applied will struggle to get an adequate key. I believe that gold-leaf is the traditional material used and is applied with some sort of blocking tool (Geoff Crabb or Bob Tedrow would tell you better). Don't know anything about gold pens from Tandy.

 

Pete

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Hi Paul

My understanding is that regilding can be a pretty thankless task. This is apparently due to all of the residues which collect on and become ingrained in the leather during use including sweat, grease, nicotine, probably beer etc. Unless the leather is thoroughly cleaned, which I expect would not be an easy job in-situ, any new gilding applied will struggle to get an adequate key. I believe that gold-leaf is the traditional material used and is applied with some sort of blocking tool (Geoff Crabb or Bob Tedrow would tell you better). Don't know anything about gold pens from Tandy.

 

Pete

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Hi Paul

My understanding is that regilding can be a pretty thankless task. This is apparently due to all of the residues which collect on and become ingrained in the leather during use including sweat, grease, nicotine, probably beer etc. Unless the leather is thoroughly cleaned, which I expect would not be an easy job in-situ, any new gilding applied will struggle to get an adequate key. I believe that gold-leaf is the traditional material used and is applied with some sort of blocking tool (Geoff Crabb or Bob Tedrow would tell you better). Don't know anything about gold pens from Tandy.

 

Pete

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Hi Paul

My understanding is that regilding can be a pretty thankless task. This is apparently due to all of the residues which collect on and become ingrained in the leather during use including sweat, grease, nicotine, probably beer etc. Unless the leather is thoroughly cleaned, which I expect would not be an easy job in-situ, any new gilding applied will struggle to get an adequate key. I believe that gold-leaf is the traditional material used and is applied with some sort of blocking tool (Geoff Crabb or Bob Tedrow would tell you better). Don't know anything about gold pens from Tandy.

 

Pete

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