Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
gmc2005

Czegesa Concertina?

Recommended Posts

I received an Anglo Concertina as a gift from an antique shop. It came in its original box which is labeled:

 

"Czegesa Brand

Concertina

No. 592

Superior Quality

Guaranteed Not To Split

Made in Germany"

 

I'm trying to determine a bit more about the instrument. I has leather handstraps, sort of a mother-of-pearl end caps with red MOP trim, and what looks like alligator impressed leather on the bellows.

 

I've search the Concertina.net site and the internet generally for this manufacturer with no luck. Anyone have any insight into this manufacturer and anything about the concertina?

 

Thanks all,

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I received an Anglo Concertina as a gift from an antique shop.  It came in its original box which is labeled:

 

"Czegesa Brand

Concertina

No. 592

Superior Quality

Guaranteed Not To Split

Made in Germany"

Sorry Greg, but I don't have any info on this brand name. But 'Czegesa' doesn't sound very German, and I wonder if perhaps it was made with a market in another country, or an emmigrant group, in mind?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I received an Anglo Concertina as a gift from an antique shop.  It came in its original box which is labeled:

 

"Czegesa Brand

Concertina

No. 592

Superior Quality

Guaranteed Not To Split

Made in Germany"

Sorry Greg, but I don't have any info on this brand name. But 'Czegesa' doesn't sound very German, and I wonder if perhaps it was made with a market in another country, or an emmigrant group, in mind?

 

I agree the brand name does not appear to be German (more Slavic/Eastern European). I would think the manufacture was in Germany then exported for sale elsewhere, but can't find anything at all on this instrument or the company.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sounds Czech to me.  They do make button boxes.

Something starting Cze- does suggest Czech, but oddly when combined with "made in Germany" it doesn't any more, except in one possible way.

 

If something was made in Germany and rebadged for the Czech market, they wouldn't write cze- but rather če- as this is how they have been spelling things in Czech for about 500 years (as in Petr Čech the goalkeeper, čech meaning Bohemian rather than Czech).

 

I could understand a Czech-made object being given a name starting cze- for export purposes, as Czechs are aware that their Czech special letters are not well-known abroad, but that is not what we have here.

 

The one possible way I mentioned is that a Czech living in Germany might have respelled his name as cze- .

 

You come across words starting cze- in Polish and Hungarian.

 

Cegesa is an Argentinean maker of kitchen appliances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The one possible way I mentioned is that a Czech living in Germany might have respelled his name as cze- .

 

You come across words starting cze- in Polish and Hungarian.

 

It could also be a German with a Polish/Hungarian/Czech name.

cze- seems quite Polish to me. Could it not be a Pole or someone

with a Polish name makingconcertinas in Germany? Also I don't

know if someone would respell their name and if so, that way. Is

there a German construction for a "che" sound?

 

Historically (according to a professor I had while in the CR), the name

"Czechoslovakia" has a Polish deriviation. The name was concieved at

the last minute during whichever treaty created the nation out of Bohemia,

Moravia, and Slovakia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It could also be a German with a Polish/Hungarian/Czech name.

cze- seems quite Polish to me. Could it not be a Pole or someone

with a Polish name makingconcertinas in Germany? Also I don't

know if someone would respell their name and if so, that way. Is

there a German construction for a "che" sound?

 

Historically (according to a professor I had while in the CR), the name

"Czechoslovakia" has a Polish deriviation. The name was concieved at

the last minute during whichever treaty created the nation out of Bohemia,

Moravia, and Slovakia.

The Germans make English ch- as tsch- , hence Tschechoslowakien in German.

 

The Czechs called their former country Československo, and their present country Česko. For some reason, as you say, the English adopted a Polish-ised spelling. The Germans have no difficulty calling CR Tschechien, and (having two Czechs in the house at present) I often call it Czechia to save awkwardness - I wish we could adopt in more generally.

 

Respellings of names are quite common in that part of the world. The common name "Black" is Schwarz in German, Černy in Czech and Czerny in Polish. These are commonly seen respelled as Švarc in CR, Szwarc in Poland, and Tscherny in Germany. A Czech might adopt a Polish spelling in Germany, as the Germans wouldn't have the accents on their typewriters, and are familiar with Polish-looking spellings. I know an Australian from the Hungarian-speaking area of Slovakia; she calls herself as she is on her Slovak birth certificate, Kováčová, derived from the Hungarian name Kovács, respelled in Slovak with a Slovak female ending added; but the Australians registered her (at their insistence) as Kovac, and she is always a bit worried someone might complain that her two passports have slightly different names.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...