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Graham Collicutt

Maybe of interest to Hayden Players

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Would be interesting if not for this ugly synthetic tone. And one funny thing - from the description on Kickstarter site it seems like this guy reinvented Wicki-Hayden for the n-th time and has no clue about previous kickstarter projects with the same layout, let alone historical inventors. 

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My guess is that he is unaware of any previous implementation of the Wicki/Hayden system. His layout is slightly different (the offset positioning of the rows above and below each other) and I think if he had seen the Wicki/Hayden he would have realized it makes more sense (more symmetrical).

 

This is the Striso layout:

 

DCompose.png

 

Note that 4ths and 5ths are not mirror images of each other as they are in Wicki/Hayden:

 

Bb  C   D
  F   G   A   B   C#
Bb  C   D   E   F#  G#
  F   G   A   B   C#  D#
    C   D   E   F#  G#

 

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One aspect of his offset that I actually like - you can play minor and major triads with the same finger on the root note, which makes a typical pop progressions easier to finger, but require wrist twist that is way harder on concertinas. 

This also shows that he started working on his grid with squares instead of hexagons and then skewed them slightly.

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12 hours ago, Łukasz Martynowicz said:

One aspect of his offset that I actually like - you can play minor and major triads with the same finger on the root note

 

I’m sorry, I don’t see what you’re saying. Which finger? The only way I see to play a 1-3-5 triad with the same finger on 1 whether it’s major or minor is to put the middle and ring fingers on the root and fifth, with the index finger for the minor 3rd or the pinkie for the major 3rd, but that works on a standard Hayden as well. This is for the right hand (since the Striso has only one side, which most of us would play with the right hand). If using the left hand, it’s the ring and middle fingers that stay on 1 and 5 with the pinkie for the minor 3rd or the index finger for the major 3rd.

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It looks very interesting but I'd like to play it with both hands like a concertina, with a keyboard on each side of the board and like my picture here. I will ask if it's possible...

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7 hours ago, David Barnert said:

 

I’m sorry, I don’t see what you’re saying. Which finger? The only way I see to play a 1-3-5 triad with the same finger on 1 whether it’s major or minor is to put the middle and ring fingers on the root and fifth, with the index finger for the minor 3rd or the pinkie for the major 3rd, but that works on a standard Hayden as well. This is for the right hand (since the Striso has only one side, which most of us would play with the right hand). If using the left hand, it’s the ring and middle fingers that stay on 1 and 5 with the pinkie for the minor 3rd or the index finger for the major 3rd.


Index finger on root, then for major triad middle finger on fifth and ring finger on third. Then ~90 degrees wrist twist gives you index still on root, middle on minor third and ring on fifth. You can also play first inversion of IVmaj mid twist (at ~45 degrees) with same fingering. On a „proper Hayden” row shift is larger so that this wrist twist is bigger and grouping my fingers to do the same feels uncomfortable.
 

The reason I find this usefull is that you can play oom-pahs and some arpeggios using same (mirrored for arpeggios) wrist-gimball-only movement which enable „tremor amplifiying” technique of fast playing. Of course on concertinas there is also hand strap preventing you from doing this, but nevertheless I find it a feature of Striso angles, not the bug.

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39 minutes ago, Łukasz Martynowicz said:

but nevertheless I find it a feature of Striso angles, not the bug.

 

I’m not sure how valuable a feature that would be. How often must one use both major and minor versions of a chord in temporal proximity to each other? Much more common is to use a major chord and then the relative minor (a 3rd lower, as G Major and E minor), moving only one finger from the 5th of the major chord down a 7th to the root of the minor chord. This works fine on both the Hayden and Striso.

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I actually have two tunes causing trouble by this. The feature I talk about is even more pronounced on slanted Park layout (similar hex based layout with whole tone/minor third/perfect fourth instead of Hayden's whole tone/perfect fourth/perfect fifth axes) where you play all major, minor, seventh, sus4 and augmented chords with a natural middle finger position further from the palm. On a Hayden you play minor and sus4 chords with inverted finger position, with your longest finger closest to the palm, which causes me a lot of troubles with left hand minor chord oom-pahs and arpeggios, because my middle finger attack angle is so skewed (I have very long fingers) and Hayden slant emphasises this problem even further for the left hand.

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