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Daniel Hersh

Bright green concertina on eBay

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Posted (edited)

Well, that will stand out!  I saw in the description the seller said it would be sent by Media Mail - but that looks like a typo.  In the actual shipping charges it says $14.90 for Priority Mail, which I believe is the cost for a medium USPS Flat Rate Priority box.  Media Mail definitely doesn't include concertinas.

Edited by Frank Dudgeon
clarity

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2 hours ago, Stephen Chambers said:

I think it's quite likely Italian.

 

 

Hi, Stephen - you know far more about concertina history than I do, so I'll defer to you.  How can you tell?

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A Trojan Horse from a distant planet populated by citizens of the same hue...🤑

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7 hours ago, Daniel Hersh said:

 How can you tell?

 

Well it looks like the ends are moulded, which I've only seen on Italian instruments, and the buttons look Italian too - German ones are fatter and flatter.

 

But we'd need to take a look inside it to be sure... 

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5 hours ago, Stephen Chambers said:

Well it looks like the ends are moulded, which I've only seen on Italian instruments, and the buttons look Italian too - German ones are fatter and flatter.

 

But we'd need to take a look inside it to be sure... 

 

I see what you mean about the buttons. 

 

Were you thinking molded plastic ends?  The listing says "Faceplates are metal."  And I think Arno Arnold may have made Chemnitzers and/or bandonions with molded plastic ends in Germany after WW2 - don't know about small concertinas though..

 

And I just noticed that the listing also says, "Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany."  I don't know if that was marked on the instrument or if the seller had another reason to say it.

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That is really pretty cool.

 

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1 hour ago, Daniel Hersh said:

I see what you mean about the buttons. 

 

Were you thinking molded plastic ends?  The listing says "Faceplates are metal."  And I think Arno Arnold may have made Chemnitzers and/or bandonions with molded plastic ends in Germany after WW2 - don't know about small concertinas though..

 

And I just noticed that the listing also says, "Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany."  I don't know if that was marked on the instrument or if the seller had another reason to say it.

 

Another thing that looks more Italian is the attachment of the ends by pins (or screws) on the sides, instead of long screws through the faceplates - but maybe it's a freak dreamt up in the GDR?

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1 hour ago, Stephen Chambers said:

 

Another thing that looks more Italian is the attachment of the ends by pins (or screws) on the sides, instead of long screws through the faceplates - but maybe it's a freak dreamt up in the GDR?

 

Some late-GDR concertinas use that attachment method too, like the one discussed at 

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Posted (edited)

I bought this in the fall. Couldn't resist as a piece of art. Matches some of my recently crafted Tiki cocktails.

IMG_0143.jpeg

IMG_0144.jpeg

Edited by Lawrence Reeves

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It actually plays reasonably, and after awhile will tear into it and make adjustable hand straps. 

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Posted (edited)

I know that wanting this is probably wrong.

 

but, somehow it reminds me of the lunch box i tool to school everyday to school in the 70s..

it’s even avacado!

 

boom chicka wah wah!

 

Edited by seanc

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Posted (edited)

An old neighbor of mine who I have lost touch with had a tastefully stained modern hybrid. It was a cheerful green with wood undertones.   I can't remember the maker, but it was a nicely made hybrid with decent action and sound. I do believe it was an instrument made in the US about 10 years ago so that sort of narrows things down.

Edited by LateToTheGame

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3 hours ago, LateToTheGame said:

An old neighbor of mine who I have lost touch with had a tastefully stained modern hybrid. It was a cheerful green with wood undertones.   I can't remember the maker, but it was a nicely made hybrid with decent action and sound. I do believe it was an instrument made in the US about 10 years ago so that sort of narrows things down.

 

Maybe Tedrow?

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I love the rounded corners on these, seems to make so much sense.  Far more touchy feely.  

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So I asked the seller why he said it was made in Germany, and he replied:

 

"That information was autofilled for me, so I can't confirm for certain that this instrument was made in Germany.
 

That said, I don't think it's not too blind of an assumption. A lot of these vintage concertinas were made in Italy, Germany, and Czech Republic.
Usually the designs are very telling of where they're from. Not often do they use metal face plates either, meaning this was probably a more expensive 'cheapo' model and I'd wager it came from Germany since the REALLY cheapo plywood/paper concertinas were right out of Italy."

 

 

On 5/3/2020 at 11:13 AM, Daniel Hersh said:

 

I see what you mean about the buttons. 

 

Were you thinking molded plastic ends?  The listing says "Faceplates are metal."  And I think Arno Arnold may have made Chemnitzers and/or bandonions with molded plastic ends in Germany after WW2 - don't know about small concertinas though..

 

And I just noticed that the listing also says, "Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany."  I don't know if that was marked on the instrument or if the seller had another reason to say it.

 

On 5/3/2020 at 12:51 PM, Stephen Chambers said:

 

Another thing that looks more Italian is the attachment of the ends by pins (or screws) on the sides, instead of long screws through the faceplates - but maybe it's a freak dreamt up in the GDR?

 

On 5/3/2020 at 2:05 PM, Daniel Hersh said:

 

Some late-GDR concertinas use that attachment method too, like the one discussed at https://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?/topic/15436-first-post-and-first-concertina/

 

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