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Wolf Molkentin

Edward Jay's 3D-printed EC!

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you might want to read (and listen to) this - amazing effort and outcome!

 

Edited by Wolf Molkentin

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That sounds very good. So..... what would it cost as a production-run instrument? If it comes out at a reasonable price it would be a very good starter instrument and would make the concertina much more accessible. I don't doubt that this method could be used for any type of concertina and could revolutionise the instrument by allowing easy experimentation with many variables. 

 

Dick.

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Interesting, eh !

    He describes himself as  "not a concertina player "........ wish I wasn't a concertina player too !

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He said trad reeds and bellows. That is despite what looks like a printed set of bellows in the article. Coming soon, perhaps.

 

Dick. 

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8 hours ago, DickT said:

He said trad reeds and bellows.

 

I think it's a hybrid (accordion style reeds), not traditional concertina reeds.

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3 hours ago, alex_holden said:

 

I think it's a hybrid (accordion style reeds), not traditional concertina reeds.

If so then there is a clue here about how to make accordion reeds sound like concertina reeds.

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35 minutes ago, Don Taylor said:

If so then there is a clue here about how to make accordion reeds sound like concertina reeds.

 

Don, not sure whether they're much sounding like that - difficult to judge from a recording anyway; to hear some chords would be more instructive i think...

 

Best wishes - 🐺

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I'm wondering how the pads are joined to the levers. They appear to be integral, without the flexibility that a conventional concertina has at that point, and therefore relying entirely on the elasticity of the material on the side facing the action plate.

 

Some conventionally made concertinas have the levers held in place in essentially the same way, but I seem to recall claims that rivetting is better. Is that just because the spring pressure can tend to pull the staple (or whatever) out of the action plate, which doesn't apply with 3D printing? Or is there any other disadvantage?

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21 hours ago, Richard Mellish said:

I'm wondering how the pads are joined to the levers. They appear to be integral, without the flexibility that a conventional concertina has at that point, and therefore relying entirely on the elasticity of the material on the side facing the action plate.

It says somewhere they are attached with a small firm ball joint on the lever ends and they seal very well. David.

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On 11/13/2019 at 10:04 AM, Wolf Molkentin said:

you might want to read (and listen to) this - amazing effort and outcome!

 

I did, and I did! Wow! Remarkable! It sounds better than the pretty flaky EC I'm currently struggling with.(*)

Is it 'waterproof' - that is, can it be played outside in the rain?

 

Can we have an Anglo next - please. I don't think dimensions were mentioned, so, preferably a 'standard' 6-1/4"

ax the flats. I think if something like this were available 'commercially', I might buy one just for the hell of it...

 

(*)Sigh, It is better to have tried and failed than never to have failed at all - or something like that...

Edited by lachenal74693

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Eddy came to the recent Beginners weekend run by WCCP and demo'd the printers in action- making a bellows - the component parts and the instrument being played via a lunchtime performance in the hands of a lady 'EC' player.  I think (know!!) a few respected Board members were present, so someone may comment as to tone/playability.  As I understand it the bellows on the Demo model which was played were 'proper'/traditional bellows and the reeds are accordion type of top quality.  The lever to pads are as per comments above 'ball and cup', so fully articulated.  

 

He is a very personable chap and I am sure he would welcome contact via his various on-line options.  He's an ace accordion player too.  Duo's with Will Pound on the Folk circuit.

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On 11/13/2019 at 10:41 PM, DickT said:

He said trad reeds and bellows. That is despite what looks like a printed set of bellows in the article. Coming soon, perhaps.

That's interesting.

 

Question: can the 3D printer produce bellows (components) with the flexibility (inegral hinge) need for t'bellows? I know

nothing about this 3d printing - as far as I'm aware, I've never actually seen anything produced by a 3D printer...

 

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6 hours ago, lachenal74693 said:

Question: can the 3D printer produce bellows (components) with the flexibility (inegral hinge) need for t'bellows?.

 

I was at the WCCP weekend when Eddy showed his prototype. He had a 3D printer on the go, printing a bellows - the strategy is to 2D print the bellows structure as rigid, but with 'snap along here' weak lines. These lines are then bound using thin leather (or other modern flexible material), then bent so that the weak lines snap to make the flexible joints.

 

I had a play on the prototype, and it was quite responsive and 'concertina-like'. Work was needed on the thumbstrap and pinky rest, but quite doable I believe.

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1 hour ago, Paul_Hardy said:

...the strategy is to 2D print the bellows structure as rigid, but with 'snap along here' weak lines. These lines are then bound

using thin leather (or other modern flexible material), then bent so that the weak lines snap to make the flexible joints...

 

Ah! thank you for that clarification. So it's a composite structure.

 

I showed the beast to our Anglo/EC player at this afternoon's session - they were very impressed...

 

About 4 (?) years ago, there was a thread about fabricating concertinas for use in 'extreme' climates. At the time, I wondered

if those parts of the bellows which needed to be flexible (ie: those parts illustrated on the Concertone website) could be made

using thin sheet polypropylene with an integral hinge. Looks as if this might be a viable alternative approach...

 

(polypropylene hinges have a very long 'flex life' - we used to test them to destruction in the lab'  I worked in - IIRC, it took hours to break them by flexing them through

320 degrees about 300 (?) times a minute...)

Edited by lachenal74693

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