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When the songs celebrating the alcoholic beverages are generally made with 3 chords and the same melody repeated dozen of times, Argentine people like to compose this kind of score which gives you an headache at first sight but becomes very fun to play on a duet as you go along drinking and playing it. For those who are interested I began to write the sheet musics of the different tunes that I'm playing and I'll send it here in another thread when it will be completed:

 

https://youtu.be/CrD9q5qg-t4

 

 

 

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Delightful Didie.  You surely must currently be one of the finest duet players on the planet.

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Thank you Steve for the BIG compliment! I have yet to be able to play the other systems like you...

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Great tune, Didie, and excellent performance!  Looking forward to any sheet music you're able to share.  Do you use the bass clef for the bottom staff or the octave treble clef?

-George

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Hi George, I think that both systems will be possible on demand. What would be the more convenient for you?

I hope to complete a first tune before the end of the year and to continue after on a regular basis.

Didie

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I have been using the octave treble clef because it suits the range of the 52-button Hayden. I'd be interested in hearing what other duet players prefer.  Maybe we could post a poll.

-George

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On 10/27/2019 at 1:11 PM, dabbler said:

I'd be interested in hearing what other duet players prefer.

 

I haven’t found a good answer. I prefer the bass clef, like piano music (I also play cello), but the notes lie high in the clef. But the other choice (octave treble clef) is in a different universe from the treble clef. You can’t have an occasional note in a voice go from one clef to the other.

 

Nice job, Didie.

Edited by David Barnert
Typo

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I understand David's perspective but, because I am a very poor reader, I prefer the octave treble clef.

 

How about publishing both forms?  Musescore, for example, makes it trivial to switch clefs and I expect other commercial score editors provide similar capabilities.

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Don, no problem if you are a poor reader and to quote Jack Chantegril himself: "it's not always easy to be a good writer and a good reader at the same time!". But I'm using Finale and it will be possible to edit both forms.

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On 10/27/2019 at 1:11 PM, dabbler said:

I have been using the octave treble clef because it suits the range of the 52-button Hayden. I'd be interested in hearing what other duet players prefer.  Maybe we could post a poll.

-George

I have been using the octave bass clef, writing one octave below what is played, and a regular trebel clef, which works well to prevent colliding clefs.

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Here is the Octave Bass Clef I use. It works great for the Hayden, with middle C being notated in the second space from the bottom. I leave the trebel clef alone as middle C no longer collides with the Octave Bass Clef notes.

20191202_151757.jpg

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43 minutes ago, DougS said:

Here is the Octave Bass Clef I use. It works great for the Hayden, with middle C being notated in the second space from the bottom. I leave the trebel clef alone as middle C no longer collides with the Octave Bass Clef notes.

20191202_151757.jpg

 

It's certainly a solution, but I don’t know that it offers any advantage over the octave treble clef (see my Nov 4 comment, above). Has anyone tried the tenor clef (sounds a 5th higher than bass clef, with middle C on the 2nd line from the top). Often used in high cello music to avoid ledger lines, convenient as the cello is tuned in 5ths, so you just play one string over.

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47 minutes ago, David Barnert said:

 

It's certainly a solution, but I don’t know that it offers any advantage over the octave treble clef (see my Nov 4 comment, above). Has anyone tried the tenor clef (sounds a 5th higher than bass clef, with middle C on the 2nd line from the top). Often used in high cello music to avoid ledger lines, convenient as the cello is tuned in 5ths, so you just play one string over.

I think we are talking about 2 diff things. I thought you meant you use octave trebel clef for the right hand, which I should have realized would make no sense. So you mean you use 2 octave trebel clefs, and the left hand one plays one octave lower than written. In that case, for the left hand, both the octave trebel clef played one octave lower, or the octave bass clef played one octave higher would of course both work. As a piano player, I prefer the bass clef for the left hand, and panic even thinking of the tenor clef.

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52 minutes ago, DougS said:

I think we are talking about 2 diff things. I thought you meant you use octave trebel clef for the right hand, which I should have realized would make no sense. So you mean you use 2 octave trebel clefs, and the left hand one plays one octave lower than written. In that case, for the left hand, both the octave trebel clef played one octave lower, or the octave bass clef played one octave higher would of course both work. As a piano player, I prefer the bass clef for the left hand, and panic even thinking of the tenor clef.

I prefer using the regular treble clef for the RHS and the octave treble clef for the LHS. 

 

In this configuration neither clefs are transposing - you play the notes as written.  I don't see any advantage to using an octave treble clef for the RHS.

 

I use Musescore along with a concertina sound font and playback of a score sounds correctly using these clefs.

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