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pentaprism

Mayfair-Type Action

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I'm new to Anglo concertina.

 

I've seen an ad for a 30B Edgley with "Mayfair-type action."

 

What is it and is it better or worse than other types of action?

 

Thanks.

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Without seeing the ad I would guess that the seller isn't too familiar with concertina terminology.  The Mayfair line was a budget line of concertinas made by Wheatstone for a few years in the mid-20th century.  Perhaps the seller is slightly confused and is comparing the action of the Edgley to that of a Wheatstone?  In any case, unless this is some weird early prototype, Frank Edgley's instruments have a proper traditional riveted action, and are as good as or better than most top vintage or modern instruments in terms of ease and speed of action.

Edited by Bill N
typo

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15 minutes ago, Bill N said:

...the seller isn't too familiar with concertina terminology....

 

Thanks, Bill. But I guess this is not the case. The seller is a very popular concertina store, also a concertina maker.

 

I searched for "Mayfair concertina" and essentially found the same info as in your post. I didn't find anything as "Mayfair action."

 

I am particularly interested because I'm about to buy an Edgley (not necessarily the one in the ad).

Edited by pentaprism
Fixed typos

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Well, I'm stumped as to what the seller means.  But I have owned an Edgley, and played and heard played, a bunch more and they really are at the top of the heap when it comes to the action and playability.  Mine was a hybrid "Professional" model, with accordion reeds.  I only got rid of it to help pay for a concertina-reeded Kensington.  A musical friend, Fergus Brown O'Byrne, is a professional traditional musician in Newfoundland who plays twice as fast and more beautifully than I ever will and he swears by his.  Frank also makes a "Heritage" model with concertina reeds, although I haven't run across one of those myself.      Edited to add:  I just put 2 and 2 together and found the advert you are talking about.  It's been a while since I looked inside an Edgley (never had a problem with mine so didn't open it up a whole lot).  Maybe there is a design feature of Frank's lever and post that is a bit like the design of the Mayfair?  

Edited by Bill N

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Thanks again, Bill.

 

I'm also considering a pre-own Edgley Professional, and am glad to hear more endorsement from people who know what they are talking about. I sent email messages to the seller asking for the model of the item in the ad (I guess it's not a Professional, otherwise the ad would state so) and what they meant by "Mayfair-action," but haven't heard from them.

 

My background: I play a bit of accordion (CBA), but am trying to learn something less heavy and more portable.

Edited by pentaprism
fixed typos

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For a picture of a Mayfair action, see figure 24 in this document:

http://www.scatesconcertinas.com/pdf/RE ACTIONS - thinking inside the box 1.pdf

It's a plain wire that passes under a saddle, and the button end is bent at a right angle and goes through a small diameter unbushed hole in the button. It relies on spring pressure to hold the lever up against the underside of the saddle.

 

There are some pictures of an Edgley action on this page:

http://irish.cocolog-nifty.com/flute_concertina/2015/09/anglo-concertin.html

  • Thanks 1

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I received an email from Doug Creighton with Button Box ("the seller" mentioned in my post above). He sent me a photo of a Mayfair model (1) and a photo of the Edley in question (2). One can see their actions are of the same type.

 

For contrast, he also sent a photo of the riveted action in a Minstrel (3).

 

I appreciate his quick response.

 

Mayfair action.jpg

 

edgley 2.jpg

 

minstrel1.jpg

Edited by pentaprism

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Years ago I remember Frank telling me about the Dipper he played for many years (before he began making concertinas) - the rivet action began to wear out and got loose and noisy (that's how much he played). He'll probably chime in here, but I suspect like all makers he has developed his action design over the years. I'll add one personal observation  - Edgley concertinas have the quietest action I've ever seen (or not heard) on a modern anglo - they are silent! I once asked him how he did it, and he just grinned.

 

Ken

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Maybe it's due to the double-springing of the long lever arms? First time I've seen that.


Gary

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