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JackJ

Upgrade from a Rochelle: Clover vs. Morse

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10 hours ago, JackJ said:

If Noel Hill is back near hear next summer, I'll plan on attending his workshop.  

 

You would almost certainly need a C/G then...

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Just another comment to the OP on the quote "not lose any money..."  Please do keep in mind that nearly all concertinas depreciate and are hobbies, not investments.  Though I do believe the trade back plans that are offered are the closest.

Edited by Devils' Dream
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On 9/9/2019 at 1:15 PM, JackJ said:

Of course I may not take either of these upgrade paths, especially if I find a vintage anglo that I feel good about. But I'm curious how the Clover and Morse Céilí compare, or if there are other factors in considering which vendor to go with for a Rochelle.  Any thoughts?

 

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I own ceilis and have played Clovers; both are fine instruments that are well suited to what you want to play.  The differences are pretty minor.  I gravitate to the ceilis because of their light weight and easy playability, but honestly, either one would be great.  The Rochelle is a mixed bag; it's better than other super-cheap instruments, but it is a very stiff, awkward instrument; if you progress quickly in ITM, you will outgrow it very fast, and at a Noel Hill session, it would definitely impede your progress.

 

I haven't dealt with the Concertina Connection, so can't comment on their customer service; the Button Box customer service is excellent, and their trade up plan is backed up with a sizeable inventory.

 

The hybrid vs traditional instrument debate is endless.  I own and play both, and will say this (again): while my Jeffries is a superb player with the sound I prefer,   the Morse boxes (and undoubtedly the Clovers) are more playable and more reliable than a majority of the vintage concertinas I have played over the years.  A low-end vintage box may have that classic sound, but chances are it'll be a slower and less reliable instrument.

 

Everything in life involves trade offs. My subjective view is that for most players who have limited budgets, a good hybrid is a better choice than a low priced vintage instrument.

Edited by Jim Besser
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I agree with Jim.  I have an Edgley as my main player (I’m into concertina about 18 months).  I also have an old refurbished 26 button Jones.   The Jones has a wonderful tone but is a bit more difficult to play.   It seems I am constantly opening it up and tinkering with something while the Edgley, aside from a sometimes sticky valve seems bulletproof.   I can definitely play the Edgley faster and it seems more consistent and responsive.

 

On on another note at Noel Hill’s school this year one of the people in our group had a Rochelle.   It was a beast and seemed to me that it really impeded her progress. Just my opinion, YMMV.

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I was very interested to see (hear) that Gary Coover recently "upgraded" to a newer hybrid.  It sounded so good that I emailed him to verify that it wasn't one of Wolvertons concertina-reeded models (!)

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