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Herrington’s hand rest/buckle design


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I noticed in Herold’s papers a drawing of a handle with a spring mechanism with a pin built onto the hand rest to hold and adjust the arm straps.  I started going through his boxes and found several of them.  I know he was always inventing & trying new things.  Anyways, I thought it was interesting.

 

Cheers, Seth 

DBC88443-7EE0-4412-A073-FA4DBC392760.jpeg

Edited by Seth
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14 minutes ago, gcoover said:

Is it work like a buckle, on the bottom of the handrest?

 

Gary

Exactly, it’s a quick adjustment for the hand strap.  

 

Seth

F427D2A0-AE86-4622-AF41-3D77A1D766E5.jpeg

Edited by Seth
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1 hour ago, Seth said:

Exactly, it’s a quick adjustment for the hand strap.  

Does this require a second set of holes to be punched in the hand-straps, closer to the hand-rest so that

they fit over the pin? I'm sitting here with a concertina on my lap trying to visualise this and can't quite get

my head around how it all fits together unless there are extra holes...

 

Does this mean that the screws for securing the straps to the ends of the 'conventional' concertina can be

dispensed with?

 

Later: Ah! Now I look at the final picture, this seems to be what is happening. More haste, less speed...

This design feature is clearly visible in at least one of the pictures on the Kensington web site, though

the 'business' end isn't quite so clear..

Edited by lachenal74693
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1 hour ago, Chris Ghent said:

Don't know who invented it but Dana Johnson of Kensington Concertinas has been using this system as long as I can remember. It works very well.

 

1 hour ago, lachenal74693 said:

Does this require a second set of holes to be punched in the hand-straps, closer to the hand-rest so that

they fit over the pin? I'm sitting here with a concertina on my lap trying to visualise this and can't quite get

my head around how it all fits together unless there are extra holes...

 

Does this mean that the screws for securing the straps to the ends of the 'conventional' concertina can be

dispensed with?

 

Later: Ah! Now I look at the final picture, this seems to be what is happening. More haste, less speed...

This design feature is clearly visible in at least one of the pictures on the Kensington web site, though

the 'business' end isn't quite so clear..

 

Here is the underside..it has a spring like a clothes pin.

FE0795C4-6483-437F-8113-7F044FE3F1B5.jpeg

Edited by Seth
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I started using this style retainer for the hand strap with my first Concertinas in 1993.   I copied it from a snatch hook used to keep the rope from coming off the hook while lifting things.  This unequal leg torsion spring has been around in various uses for a very long time, though not on Concertinas.  Harold was very kind and asked me if I minded him using the design, which was fine with me.  It works well, is fast to change holes on and is very secure.  The key to it is the unequal length of the legs, which swing through different angles when lifted, putting a torsion force on the part of the spring that connects the two sides.  If you like it, use it.  Public domain as far as I am concerned.  I called it the strap-o-matic just for fun.

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