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mary-louise

56 keys Tenor Treble English Concertina

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Posted (edited)

Does anybody know where I can find a keyboard layout for a Wheatstone 56 keys Tenor/Treble English Concertina please?

Also...any video links to show how to play chords?

 

Many thanks....

 

Edited by mary-louise
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http://www.concertina.info/tina.faq/images/finger6.htm

 

This is a link to a chart for a standard 48-button treble. The tenor treble has one extra button at the lower end of each row.

 

On the left, across the 4 rows, these would be D#, D, F, F#

On the right, across the 4 rows, these would be C#, C, E, Eb

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So my suggestion has nothing to do with a video. I suggest learning and practicing arpeggios in each key. Major, minor, and add the dominant 7th. Once you are comfortable with the fingering you now have your chords structures. Later you can add in diminished chording as well. 

 

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3 hours ago, Randy Stein said:

So my suggestion has nothing to do with a video. I suggest learning and practicing arpeggios in each key. Major, minor, and add the dominant 7th. Once you are comfortable with the fingering you now have your chords structures. Later you can add in diminished chording as well. 

 

Excellent suggestion.

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12 hours ago, Randy Stein said:

So my suggestion has nothing to do with a video. I suggest learning and practicing arpeggios in each key. Major, minor, and add the dominant 7th. Once you are comfortable with the fingering you now have your chords structures. Later you can add in diminished chording as well. 

 

 

Randy, good suggestion, though it doesn't seem to be a response to the original post here.   Posted in the wrong thread?

 

But to go with your post, I have always maintained that the keys outside "the usual" are not "harder to learn"; they're only "more difficult" because people don't practice them.  Even those keys in which the scale can't be done by alternating ends (e.g., C# major) have their own patterns, which can be "internalized" by practice... but not by practice of the scales which have a different ("the usual") pattern.

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Posted (edited)

Speaking of patterns, you can also think of EC chords in terms of triangles -  I think these charts by William Meredith have been posted previously but here they are again.

 

Chords can also be played outside the root triad, and across the two ends, but that's a little trickier to show, better to just experiment and find what you like!

 

Gary

 

 

wm_english_chords_left.jpg

wm_english_chords_right.jpg

Edited by gcoover
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2 hours ago, gcoover said:

...

Chords can also be played outside the root triad, and across the two ends, but that's a little trickier to show, better to just experiment and find what you like!

...

 

Using the root triads - the triangles shown in these diagrams - is a starting point, but rather limited. Two variations to consider, right from the start in my view, are:

 

1. Spread chords. Starting with the triad (triangle) as shown, take out the middle note and instead play it an octave higher (on the other side). Can often sound mellower than the basic triad.

 

2. First inversion. Starting with the triad as shown take out the bottom note and play it an octave higher (on the other side).

 

These two techniques, along with the root triad, will allow you to play a more satisfying accompaniment where the top note of the chord (or the bottom note or even both) follow a musical progression.

 

LJ

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For a lot of traditional music, it often sounds better when you just play the open 5th (leave out the far end of the triangle). And on the EC, you can often play that with one finger mashing down both buttons.

 

Gary

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On 7/13/2019 at 12:04 AM, John Wild said:

http://www.concertina.info/tina.faq/images/finger6.htm

 

This is a link to a chart for a standard 48-button treble. The tenor treble has one extra button at the lower end of each row.

 

On the left, across the 4 rows, these would be D#, D, F, F#

On the right, across the 4 rows, these would be C#, C, E, Eb

 

Thank you John for your information.

I also found your link to Kettle Bridge interesting.   Am assuming this takes place somewhere in America?

Many thanks.   Regards Mary-Louise

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On 7/14/2019 at 4:27 AM, Randy Stein said:

So my suggestion has nothing to do with a video. I suggest learning and practicing arpeggios in each key. Major, minor, and add the dominant 7th. Once you are comfortable with the fingering you now have your chords structures. Later you can add in diminished chording as well. 

 

 

Thanks Randy for your help.

It has been suggested to me before that I should learn the scales first and then practice the chords.   A good start!   I shall do just that!

regards,

Mary-Louise

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On 7/14/2019 at 8:15 AM, Steve Wilson said:

 

Excellent suggestion.

 

Will do Steve!

 

Cheers

Mary-Louise

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14 hours ago, Little John said:
16 hours ago, gcoover said:

...

Chords can also be played outside the root triad, and across the two ends, but that's a little trickier to show, better to just experiment and find what you like!

...

 

Using the root triads - the triangles shown in these diagrams - is a starting point, but rather limited. Two variations to consider, right from the start in my view, are:

 

1. Spread chords. Starting with the triad (triangle) as shown, take out the middle note and instead play it an octave higher (on the other side). Can often sound mellower than the basic triad.

 

2. First inversion. Starting with the triad as shown take out the bottom note and play it an octave higher (on the other side).

 

These two techniques, along with the root triad, will allow you to play a more satisfying accompaniment where the top note of the chord (or the bottom note or even both) follow a musical progression.

 

REALLY HELPFUL TIPS!   Thanks from Mary-Louise

 

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Thank you to all those helpful tips and to Steve Wilson's video.   

Now to set up my practice of scales ...and then on to chord playing.

 

Much appreciated.....regards Mary-Louise

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19 hours ago, Little John said:

to play a more satisfying accompaniment where the top note of the chord (or the bottom note or even both) follow a musical progression

 

a very good point; the top note can than just follow the melody, if required/desired, and Gary‘s suggestion to leave out the third in favour of an open fifth goes very well together with it: start with fifth and try to include one either above the root or below the top note (and don‘t avoid the diminished fifth if so provided by the scale), and see/hear where this will take you...

 

Best wishes - 🐺

 

P.S.: technically this would be resulting in playing tenths with a third note inbetween, as already discussed, f.i. by John and myself...

 

 

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14 hours ago, gcoover said:

For a lot of traditional music, it often sounds better when you just play the open 5th (leave out the far end of the triangle). And on the EC, you can often play that with one finger mashing down both buttons.

 

Gary

 

I agree; and an open fifth (or rather a succession of open fifths) held with one finger allows you to play a melody above it; but perhaps it's best to learn to walk before trying to run!

 

LJ

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10 hours ago, mary-louise said:

 

Thank you John for your information.

I also found your link to Kettle Bridge interesting.   Am assuming this takes place somewhere in America?

Many thanks.   Regards Mary-Louise

Kettle Bridge Clogs and Kettle Bridge Concertinas are based in Kent, South East England. The Clogs dance side have been going since 1984, but sadly this is the final year.  Older members have been retiring and despite lots of effort, there is a lack of younger dancers coming in to carry on the tradition. "Kettle" is a medieval form of cattle, and the name refers to an actual bridge, now a footbridge only.

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