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Hi. Sorry if this is a repeat but I couldn't find another similar. One of the brass end bolts holding the right hand side to the bellows has snapped on my anglo 30 key Lachenal. The end is a fraction below the lever of the belows so I cannot get at it with pliers. I have tried superglueing the top of the bolt on and unscrewing it but that does not do the trick. If I could somehow cut a small slot in it I could get a fine screwdriver in and extract it that way. Any ideas?

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The end bolt is retained by a brass retainer plate which is usually screwed into the bellows frame.

To get at this retainer, lift the chamois at the broken bolt piece, then unscrew the 2 small screws securing the retaining plate.

Recommend that you try and source a replacement end bolt - threads may not have been standardised depending on when your 'tina was made, so you'll have to be careful getting a replacement end bolt with suitable matching thread - failure to do this might result in cross-threading and eventual possible failure of the retaining plate thread.

 

I once had a similar problem on a 'tina I restored, where 3-4 bolts had snapped off - I replaced all retaining plates and bolts with modern threaded equivalents.

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Thanks, Steve. Let me make sure I have this right though. By the chamois do you mean the covering at the end of the bellows? Presumably from around the hole where I can see the end of the broken bolt and not from the bellows end. Is that right?

 

Cheers

 

Dave

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, dpolshaw said:

Thanks, Steve. Let me make sure I have this right though. By the chamois do you mean the covering at the end of the bellows? Presumably from around the hole where I can see the end of the broken bolt and not from the bellows end. Is that right?

Yes  - that cover is chamois leather - remove the reed pan - the chamois can be lifted from inside the bellows.

The chamois should be glued back when you complete the job.

You can try concertina-spares.com for an end bolt (and maybe its respective retainer plate).

The Concertina Maintenance Manual by Dave Elliot may help you (I don't have my copy to hand so can't check if this issue is covered).

Edited by SteveS

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congrats!

 

and as this is sorted out, my issue is somewhat related:

 

is there any sense in replacing a simple wood screw with an insert nut without a retaining plate, just screwed into the wood as a first improving step for a simple 20b Anglo which is not sufficiently sealed by those wood screws any more?

 

thanks in advance - 🐺

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, Wolf Molkentin said:

is there any sense in replacing a simple wood screw with an insert nut without a retaining plate, just screwed into the wood as a first improving step for a simple 20b Anglo which is not sufficiently sealed by those wood screws any more?

There are several options here:

1 - cut out the offending bad wood and put new piece of wood in - something like sycamore - this will be at least as secure as the previous fittings - use wood screws

2 -  use a bolt with a modern thread, make a retaining hole for the nut in the bellows frame, and securely glue in place the nut - the bolt may not match the remaining wood screws

3 - fashion a rectangular retaining plate, drill and tap it with a modern thread, cut a slot for it in the bellows frame and secure the retaining plate with small wood screws.

 

Personally though, I tend to shy away from using modern threaded bolts unless I'm replacing all bolts and retaining plates - which I've done on a few concertinas.

 

Edited by SteveS

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48 minutes ago, dpolshaw said:

Wayhay! Sorted 😄 Thanks Steve - Much appreciated.

 

:) glad it worked out

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