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Is there a 'golden period' for the Lachenal Edeophone?

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Is there a so called 'golden or good period' as far as the Edeophone is concerned.   Also, is it true to say they were as equally as good as the Aeola?

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I think that the general consensus wrt lachenals is that the quality varies enormously. There was a thread on it a few years ago.They had a very very good reed maker called Mr. Green ,whose instruments were exceptional, but they also had some pretty average reed makers.....try before you buy!?

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it would be good advice to look at the action too - there seems to be a good chance that it’s riveted, but I reckon not all Edeos are built this way - with Lachenal‘s „hook“ action an instrument will hardly be considered as equaling an Æola

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1 hour ago, Wolf Molkentin said:

t would be good advice to look at the action too - there seems to be a good chance that it’s riveted, but I reckon not all Edeos are built this way - with Lachenal‘s „hook“ action an instrument will hardly be considered as equaling an Æola

 

It is fairly uncommon for Edeophones to have factory rivet action.  The three or four I have come across that had rivet action also had the early aluminum reed shoes that often came with their own set of problems.

 

Given a standard Lachenal action in decent shape a good repair person should be able to set up the hook and arm action to have a light touch.  It takes some time and persistence.  I've had numerous successes with Edeos and other Lachenals.  Please remember that after 1934 Wheatstone abandoned rivet action and went to its own hook and arm set up.  I think it is ill advised to pass up a good sounding, responsive instrument simply because it does not have rivet action.

 

There are a number of accomplished players and concertina cognoscenti who prefer the sound of the Edeophone over the Aeola.  I've also heard several veteran repair people say that Edeo bellows were superior to Wheatstone Aeolas.  I tend to agree.

 

If necessary someone like Wim Wakker could replace a worn or compromised action with his own rivet action.

 

In the end different horses for different courses.

 

Greg

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Edeophones with serial numbers around the early 40000s are most likely to have rivetted actions.The later edeophones in the 50000s virtually all tend to have the normal lachenal hook action.

   I have a new model lachenal treble...which is essentially a 6 sided edeophone.........it has the hook action.I have owned numerous wheatstone treble aeolas and model 22s which have been very very good.But I've always found the new model a little bit better.Like Greg says ....horses for courses......and essential to try something before you buy it.All these instruments have had different lives over the last 100 years, but some I feel must have started life better.

   Good look with the edeophone hunt.... it'll be a tricky expedition!!

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Definitely try before you buy if you can, based on my experience.

 

I have owned English system Edeophones and never really liked them. I wasn't happy with the tone, volume, responsiveness. I used them as “reserves”, but sold them eventually.

 

Against my experience (and my advice above!) I bought a small (46 button) MacCann Edeophone without trying it. I think it’s a great instrument: fast, responsive, loud, great tone etc. It was meant as a smaller, lighter, alternative to my large (69 button) MacCann Aeola but I prefer playing it, despite its limited range. I wish I had a large Edeophone which was as good as the small one as well!

 

Steve

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1 hour ago, scoopet said:

Like Greg says ....horses for courses......and essential to try something before you buy it

 

I entirely agree in this regard. My personal experience with Lachenal concertinas stems from my first EC which was an Excelsior, probably sold in the 20ies, but essentially the predecessor of the "new model" - and albeit I loved it (and still do; it has a sweet "woody" sound and fantastic balance all over its range) and tried to convince myself of the good playability of the isntrument (apart from a noticeable lack of air supply) I must say that both my (Wheatstone) model 24 and my TT Aeola are playing "in another league" so-to-speak.

 

Best wishes - 🐺

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