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10 minutes ago, Paul_Hardy said:

Certainly the Hall effect contactless switching mechanism used by Roy of Accordion Magic has worked well - no dirty contact problems.

 

I concluded that using Hall effect sensors is the only way to go, which implies making something like a regular action mechanism.  Then I think that you need  set of real (good quality) bellows along with some pressure sensors to give you the abiilty to shape the sound and suddenly you are more than halfway to building a real concertina.

 

Wim Wakker once sold a midi Anglo with real bellows and electromechanical switches.  I believe that the lifetime of the switches was very short and Wim no longer sells that concertina.  It is a pity that he did not use one of his action boards along with Hall effect sensors.

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On 3/21/2019 at 10:01 PM, Don Taylor said:

I concluded that using Hall effect sensors is the only way to go, which implies making something like a regular action mechanism.  Then I think that you need  set of real (good quality) bellows along with some pressure sensors to give you the abiilty to shape the sound and suddenly you are more than halfway to building a real concertina.

 

Wim Wakker once sold a midi Anglo with real bellows and electromechanical switches.  I believe that the lifetime of the switches was very short and Wim no longer sells that concertina.  It is a pity that he did not use one of his action boards along with Hall effect sensors.

Why are mechanical switches troublesome in this application? They work well enough in computer keyboards. And for a MIDI concertina you don't need them to be velocity sensitive as you do on a piano-style keyboard.

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2 hours ago, Richard Mellish said:

Why are mechanical switches troublesome in this application? They work well enough in computer keyboards. And for a MIDI concertina you don't need them to be velocity sensitive as you do on a piano-style keyboard.

Computer keyboard switches were the only electromechanical switches I could find that would be durable enough.  The switches  made by Cherry specifically for gamers (who make their own custom keyboards) were by far the best and one of them, the Cherry MX Red I think it was, needs 50gm force to close and does not have a tactile click - perfect  This looks ideal but, like all computer keyboard switches, it has a large footprint.  Anglo players might just about accept the larger spacing (I don't know that for sure) but I wanted to build a Hayden and they simply would not fit together that would yield anything close to the inter-button spacing.  An EC would be the same or even worse.

 

If l wanted to build a melodeon then these Cherry switches would be my first choice.  

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Having a Streb provides insight to a lot of your comments here.  Cannot imagine not having the bellows and bellows/attack expression controls.  The Lachenel patch is pretty nice.

Edited by Devils' Dream
clarity

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I've been lurking on this thread (although do not pretend to understand most of the technical info), as I have always been interested in the possibilities of such an instrument- especially the "silent practice" function, and the ability to change the key one is playing in with the press of a button.  I saw a respected player of traditional Newfoundland dance music playing a digital button accordion last summer (a Roland as I recall), and in all respects it seemed like a very successful and fully sorted instrument.  I wondered why this technology hasn't made its way to concertinas?

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4 hours ago, Bill N said:

I wondered why this technology hasn't made its way to concertinas?

Probably because it's not economically viable.

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