Jump to content
polavoy

Wheatstone concertina leaflet

Recommended Posts

Came across this Wheatstone leaflet in the loft which I must have got in the 70s. It makes for interesting reading. The English concertina being the most popular system and the the Anglo lends itself to non music readers. 😂 How times change. When was the Wheatstone factory in Edgware?

99BCB160-08D3-4B6C-9CE1-213B597B81C4.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neat! Must have been printed in the 1950s, judging by the “after two centuries,” which must refer to the 1750 date of the establishment of “The House of Wheatstone.” It can’t refer to the 1827 date of the invention of the concertina, because two centuries haven’t passed yet. I’ve never seen that 1827 date before. It’s usually given as 1829, the date of the patent.

 

Are these inaccuracies in the text? The Model 4E Aeola is described as having a full 4-octave range (G to G) but only 48 keys. You’d need 49 keys to represent every note in 4 octaves (including the Gs at both ends), and that’s not counting enharmonics. The description of the Anglos at the top of the page on the right describes the different notes on the blow and draw as “varying by half a tone.” Surely some of them are whole tones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, David Barnert said:

You’d need 49 keys to represent every note in 4 octaves (including the Gs at both ends), and that’s not counting enharmonics

 

Including them makes it a total of 56 keys (one enharmonic double at the top apparently being omitted).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×