Jump to content

How do I remove reeds from pan


Recommended Posts

How do I remove the reeds from the pan of a concertina? Thought I'd try out a cheap lachenal duet macann (100£) and have found it needs some serious tuning. 

 

Also just a quick question if I want to make the sound lower or higher which area do I need to file. 

 

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Removing the reeds should be simple: just push the shoes out.

 

Tuning them is another matter. It isn’t just a matter of where to file. Unsuitable filing will destroy the reeds and they are probably the most important part of the instrument. It is best done by somebody who has built up the necessary skills.

 

I suggest you buy a copy of the Concertina Maintenance Manual by David Elliot. It is full of helpful information on maintenance, tuning, etc.

 

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, accordian said:

Thought I'd try out a cheap lachenal duet macann (100£) and have found it needs some serious tuning. 

Are you sure it is out of tune? 

 

The  Maccann layout is not logical at first glance and is nothing like an Anglo or any other concertina or accordion layout.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Don Taylor said:

Are you sure it is out of tune? 

 

The  Maccann layout is not logical at first glance and is nothing like an Anglo or any other concertina or accordion layout.

 

 

When I change direction on the same button it sounds different like a anglo. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Wolf Molkentin said:

you might consider that just the reeds have been falsely swapped...

I doubt it. When I said like an Anglo I meant 2 different tones however they sound different like a pitch bend. 

 

As well as this some of the reeds take a lot of effort to get them to sound so I think that means that the reeds need a bit of gentle bending back to its centre point. 

 

Thanks for all the info guys! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, Wolf Molkentin said:

in the first place I would slide a thin piece of paper under the reed from tip to root in order to free it from dust bits that might have altered response and pitch of it...

didn't know that could be a reason as to why the reeds would sound off, i mean it doesn't look like the reeds are really dirty. hmm i will have to try that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Wolf Molkentin said:

possibly - but I was thinking of longer to start sounding at all...

well that's what i meant as well just described slightly differently. some of the reeds i need to put alot more work in  the bellows in order to get any sound and this instruments air leakge is huge so that doesn't help.

 

I bought this instrument hoping to try out a duet however I think that all I have done is buy a instrument which is in a bit of a wrecked state. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, accordian said:

well that's what i meant as well just described slightly differently. some of the reeds i need to put alot more work in  the bellows in order to get any sound and this instruments air leakge is huge so that doesn't help.

 

I bought this instrument hoping to try out a duet however I think that all I have done is buy a instrument which is in a bit of a wrecked state. 

I'm facing a similar situation with a pretty rosewood ended Lachenal tutor that I bought right from a friend.  It's a mess.  After a period of "why the heck did I buy this piece of junk?" I started thinking of it's problems individually.  I've never worked on a concertina and have done only minor repairs and adjustments to fiddles, banjos and such.  I began to realize that there are cosmetic issues, mechanical issues.and acoustical issues   To quote my daughter when she was around two years old: " Look, daddy it's a bouquet of motorcycles!".  Setting aside the cosmetic, solve the mechanics and the acoustical problems disappear.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, accordian said:

 

I bought this instrument hoping to try out a duet however I think that all I have done is buy a instrument which is in a bit of a wrecked state. 

 

If it’s in such a bad state, you don’t have a lot to lose. 

 

Why not not buy the book I mentioned earlier and use your duet to learn about concertina repair, tuning and maintenance? These are skills which will be useful in the future as most instruments are likely to need a bit of tweaking now and then.

 

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...