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MelBoy

Colin Dipper Pride of Albion Anglo

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Colin Dipper Pride of Albion Anglo for sale

 

For sale is my beautiful Pride of Albion 36 button Anglo made by Colin Dipper. I have owned the instrument for approximately 12 years; it previously belonged to the illustrious Robin Harrison who, as I understand, commissioned 2 of these instruments and still retains one.

 

All of Colin's instruments are superb as we know ... I've never played one that was not excellent. But the Pride of Albion is a true Rolls Royce model amongst Colin's concertinas. It is standard size  6¼ inches across the flats. It has raised sterling silver ends with stunning fretwork, the buttons are ebony, the sides a beautiful polished dark rosewood. The hand rails are one of Colin's special ergonomic shapes, designed to make the instrument feel easier in one's hands. The tone, volume and action are simply awesome. The instrument is dated 1986, and numbered 110.

 

My reason for buying this specific instrument is that I play Irish music ... This instrument really asserts itself in a session with great tone and projection. And the generously sized ebony buttons are a real plus. I've owned a string of Wheatstones and Jeffries over the years and always preferred bone buttoned Jeffries because when you hit the buttons - the buttons move instantly. The action on this Dipper is similarly easy and absolutely instant.

 

My reason for selling is simple ... I no longer play the concertina. I now play the melodeon exclusively, plus a bit of fiddle. I wish I'd had this Dipper in my 'heyday' back when I was playing with the Norfolk Irish bunch, who I greatly admire and miss. I could name-drop a few notable people who have played this concertina over the years and admired it but I don't think that's cool to do on a public forum.

 

I'm happy to answer any questions and supply further photos. I will attach a soundfile when I've made one. I also will provide the layout, which I am pretty sure is Wheatstone layout.

 

(I've just hit the limit of upload size with a single photo. Over the next day or so I will reduce the file sizes and upload a complete set including internals.)

 

Price is £6,500 + postage. The original case is included.

 

I'm happy to arrange Skype/FaceTime chat to view the concertina and discuss. I'm also happy for anyone to play and /or collect from Cornwall, and I regularly make trips from Cornwall to London. 

 

As regards postage, I am well used to wrapping and dispatching melodeons world-wide and happy to send this overseas at the buyer's expense and risk. I generally use Parcelforce Global Priority, which is tracked and signed for. Within the UK I would recommend Royal Mail Special Delivery, although the insurance on this extends to a maximum of £2,500 cover against loss.

 

If you are interested, please contact me by pm. The customary donation to Cnet will be made if a sale results.
 
Mike Rowbotham (UK Cornwall based)

IMG_3769.jpg

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A reputable buyer has just come forward for this instrument, and asked me to consider it sold, which I do.

 

best wishes!

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it previously belonged to the illustrious Robin Harrison 

 Two issues here...................... I did not  commision or nor own any of these.!!

                    Nor am I illustrious..............although I do glow in the dark sometimes !

Robin

                                        

                 

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Crumbs Robin,

 

... My sincere Apologies ... I was sure it was you that it originally came from!!

 

The only other contact on that side of the pond I have is Paul Read, and I will ask him. I am sure he will remember. I'll also ask Colin and Rosalie, who I know reasonably well. I do know that a pair of these was originally ordered  and that the seller retained one, which he continued to play. I did honestly think it was you!!

 

I send my best wishes and please accept my sincere apologies for the statement, and the error!  I'll also let you know what I discover.

 

Mike Rowbotham

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1 hour ago, MelBoy said:

not solid silver ... I guess its silver plate!

 

I have wondered about making solid sterling ends. At today's prices you'd be looking at about £290 for the metal (not counting the possibility of cashing in the scrap pieces), so it isn't totally out of the realm of possibility for a really high-end instrument. You might run into some difficulty with getting it hallmarked.

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What would be the advantages and drawbacks of sterling silver ends? Wouldn't they need a lot of polishing?

 

LJ

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6 minutes ago, Little John said:

What would be the advantages and drawbacks of sterling silver ends? Wouldn't they need a lot of polishing?

 

Probably similar to nickel silver in that regard, though arguably aged sterling silver develops a more attractive patina than nickel silver. One advantage is it wouldn't cause a reaction in people with nickel sensitive skin.

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I imagine using Sterling Silver  would  warm up the tone  a wee bit, even give a nice  'bell like' quality  to the notes.  It might depend on what state of hardness the silver was left  in after working.

 

Tarnish  could be a problem  but  choosing  the  alloy  Argentium    should reduce  the need for  cleaning  by  a considerable  amount.  Argentium  is a silver alloy  that  has  the addition of Germanium   and a higher  silver content  than Sterling... it also  costs a little more .

 

A few years ago   I had  an Aeola  with ' Brittania Metal'  ends  according to the  Wheatstone Ledgers, (not to be confused with Brittania Silver)... however  this  'softer'  metal  ended instrument had the most  beautifull tone  I have ever experienced  on a concertina... ok  it was a 'special'  and a top of the range MacCann Duet  from THE very best period  but I am sure the type of metal  had  an important affect  on the tone quality.I do wish the  current owner would  make a  few recordings  of this  great  instrument.

 

 

Edited by Geoff Wooff
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Hi C.netters,

 

OK .... the buyer for the Dipper Pride of Albion has now withdrawn his offer. I have to accept the situation, though it is slightly perplexing given the enthusiasm of his initial request and assurances. Moreover, this withdrawal was without either seeing further photos nor hearing a sound file.... C'est la vie! ... He was most apologetic ; we have all had buyers remorse and we will all remain friends!

 

Other people are welcome to contact me but I would prefer first to do a bit more research on the previous owner, as I am clearly mistaken in its provenance. Colin I am sure will be able to assist.

 

I will also supply further photos (I have taken these but they need to be made web-friendly, or reduced in MBytes or whatever...this is where a digital wife is very handy!)

 

I will also make a recording and upload a soundfile to my Soundcloud site.

 

finally the layout I have checked .... this is a slightly modified Wheatstone layout, with a low A on the draw 1st button inner row left hand, as found in Jeffries (this is a bespoke reed, stamped A, and has not been not tuned down) ... Also both C# reeds are on the same button, the second accidental on Right, the first accidental being F#/D#. Other than this, the layout is standard Wheatstone. The drone is D/D. 

 

I hope this helps, and let the merry-go-round continue......I'd better see if I can muster a few decent tunes on the Anglo!

 

cheers

 

mike R

 

 

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Others may be wondering like me...is this a C/G instrument? [Apologies if you've stated this above and I've missed it] Those accidentals would make sense on a C/G.

 

Ken

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Make sure  both you and your buyers do homework regarding their country's systems on  Cites II restrictions for exporting and importing woods if you are selling outside your home country.  Rosewood is currently on the restricted list, though they are talking about changing that for musical instruments in 2019.  It would be a shame to have this purchased only to be destroyed at customs.   Antique instruments are exempt, but not used ones. I think antiques are more than 40 years old, but I can't remember now.  I would check with your country's agency for specifics.  In the US the agency in charge of this is U.S. Fish and Wildlife.   The agency will vary country to country.  There was a used Cocobo flute shipped from the US to the UK early this year.  The seller did not realize Cocobo was on the restricted list and the instrument was confiscated, gone for ever.   I was told by U.S. Fish and Wildlife's Chicago office over a year ago  that an instrument sold became a commercial transaction as of the date of the sale, whether it was made pre-cites II or not.   This was right after the law came into effect and interpretations may have changed.  You will likely need an import and export permit for the wood for both the shipper and receiver.  There is a lot of info on this on the Chiff and Fipple Flute forum as blackwood was also restricted. Flutemakers have a lot more paperwork to do making sure they have a paper trail that the wood they use was sustainably harvested.   As I said, they are reviewing these rules (at the Hague?) with the idea they may exclude musical instruments next year.  As it currently reads you can travel with your personal  instrument containing up to 15 kilos of restricted wood.    So would you be skirting the rules if you took a trip and brought it home? I don't know and I'd hate to find out by seeing my Dipper walk down the hall under a customs person's arm never to be seen again.    At least one Canadian lost his personal hybrid after a gathering in the US because the Canadian Customs agent thought it looked "too new".  It was assumed he was trying to get around the rules. So people are encouraged to travel with their old reciepts if they have them. Again, if the powers that be make the exception for instruments this may no longer be a problem in a year or two.    These rules are taken  very seriously.  I recently had a new Dipper shipped to the US. It spend a couple of days in "Homeland Security" where it was opened and viewed.   In my case the woods were all Cites II compliant and clearly listed on the customs declaration.   Chris Algar may have some info on this. 

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