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23 hours ago, Alex West said:

Looks more like sellotape holding the ends together!

 

BTW, I have a relatively early Dipper (No 104) with pierced ends.  It's a GD but with the G row an octave higher than a normal GD. It's a very piercing sound but how much of that is due to the pierced ends and how much the pitching is difficult to tell

 

Alex West

So the G row is higher than the D row?  Tuned a 4th apart rather than a 5th.  I wonder if that was made for a melodeonist.  Most melodeons in England are DG.

 

I used to play melodeon but soon after I started to work hard on the Anglo, I let the melodeon go because the two keyboards are "inside out" compared to each other.  I know some people can do it, but it just dd my head in.

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1 hour ago, Mikefule said:

I let the melodeon go because the two keyboards are "inside out" compared to each other.  I know some people can do it, but it just dd my head in.

 

A melodeon-playing friend of mine felt the same - he passed up the chance of a cheap Jeffries GD for that reason and stuck to the melodeon. But actually the two keyboards aren't "inside out" - it's just that one tends to play melodeon in the bottom octave and concertina in the top octave of the core two-octave compass.

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I used to own a Lachenal anglo with metal ends on wooden frames.  Nothing unusual there.  However the edges of the frames were pierced, if I recall correctly with pair of small f holes on each side. To my regret I don't seem to have a photo of it now.  I've never seen another one quite like it.

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6 hours ago, Little John said:

 

A melodeon-playing friend of mine felt the same - he passed up the chance of a cheap Jeffries GD for that reason and stuck to the melodeon. But actually the two keyboards aren't "inside out" - it's just that one tends to play melodeon in the bottom octave and concertina in the top octave of the core two-octave compass.

There are two things going on.

  1. On an Anglo, the right hand is playing what would be the top octave of the same row of a melodeon.  That means that the pull note is one lower than the push note.  Most melodeonists play in the bottom octave, at least at first.
  2. On an Anglo, the row nearer to your wrist (inside row) is a 5th higher than the outside row.  On a melodeon, it is lower.  That means that all cross row fingering is different.  If an anglo is GD, the melodeon is DG.
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Mike

 

The cross row fingering is indeed different.  It was made for a specific person playing Southern English music in an idiosyncratic style but he was an anglo player first (although he did gravitate towards Cajun button accordeons before giving up free reed instruments entirely and becoming a proper musician - saxophone and drums!).

 

Since I now play normally configured anglos, it's harder for me to get the most out of the Dipper but I still get it out occasionally for a bit of exercise

 

Alex West

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