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adrian brown

Forgive me if your looks I thought

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This is an example of a ‘Cebell’ or ‘Cibell’, a short lived English form from the late 17th century named after an air in Lully’s 1676 opera Atys that accompanies the descent to earth of the goddess Cybele. The air became very popular in England and Purcell is credited with being the first to make a parody of it, which itself was parodied by many other composers. This version comes from Playford’s Musical Banquet and seems to have been written by Robert King - other versions of the same tune have the name as I love you more and more each day. I play it twice, the second time attempting some typical Baroque ornamentation…

 

 

Adrian

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Sounds great, Adrian.

 

Tell me... There’s an awkward sounding moment at the beginning of the 2nd half of the tune that I’m tempted to think is a result of the historic temperament your instrument is tuned to. I don’t really know enough about the specifics of how the different temperaments work. Is that note indeed a wolf?

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5 hours ago, David Barnert said:

Sounds great, Adrian.

 

Tell me... There’s an awkward sounding moment at the beginning of the 2nd half of the tune that I’m tempted to think is a result of the historic temperament your instrument is tuned to. I don’t really know enough about the specifics of how the different temperaments work. Is that note indeed a wolf?

Thanks David,

 

Is it the point at 0:24 (and 1:14 in the ornamented version) where I let the E-major chord hang over the upbeat to the new section? There's a momentary clash between the E-major chord and the G natural of the upbeat to the second section, but I quite like that little bit of tension before the relief of the C-major opening chord. (I think I may have emphasised it a bit more in the first version than the second?) That said, I'm probably so used to it now that it's not registering with me so much any more. In any case is, it is more due to my ineptitude, than a temperament issue :-)

 

Cheers,

Adrian

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Thanks a lot, I'm glad you liked it.

 

David, I asked Susanna what she thought of that little clash at the start of the second half and she said it was an example of "lazy playing" - I can't win them all...

 

Adrian

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Well, there's unison, there's harmony, and then there's....jazz!

 

Who knew it started in the 17th century?

 

Own it, Adrian, no apologies!

 

Gary

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On 10/10/2018 at 2:03 AM, adrian brown said:

Is it the point at 0:24 (and 1:14 in the ornamented version) where I let the E-major chord hang over the upbeat to the new section?

 

Yeah, that’s it.

 

On 10/10/2018 at 2:03 AM, adrian brown said:

In any case is, it is more due to my ineptitude, than a temperament issue 🙂

 

I wouldn’t say “ineptitude.” You went out on a limb, and reasonable people disagree on whether the limb is sturdy enough to hold you. In any case, thank you for answering my question.

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On 10/14/2018 at 6:31 AM, David Barnert said:

 

Yeah, that’s it.

 

 

I wouldn’t say “ineptitude.” You went out on a limb, and reasonable people disagree on whether the limb is sturdy enough to hold you. In any case, thank you for answering my question.

 

I always admire those who can pull off an unexpected twist or turn in music, always with the security that they have a good reason for doing so. Perhaps pushing a rule, or tradition a bit and in the process making a connection between themselves, the listener and the "rule set" which they understand and can exploit. Having neither a formal musical background, nor connections to any musical tradition, I think I can be rather naive when I go out on a limb, because I only have my ears and feelings to guide me and have to rely on others to guide me back when I go too far off the beaten track. Anyway, this is just a long way of saying thanks and that I really appreciate these sort of exchanges because they teach me to think more about why I do things and, yes, hopefully avoid laziness in my playing.

 

Cheers,

 

Adrian

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