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Here is my performance of Edith Piaf's Padam Padam*. Performed at the Saturday evening concert at this years Northeast Squeeze-in. 

 

 

*Padam, padam..." is a song originally released in 1951 by Édith Piaf. It was written for her by Henri Contet (lyrics) and Norbert Glanzberg (music)

 

 

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Randy, this is amazing stuff, IMHO.  I was lucky enough to be there for the live performance (in fact, I suspect it is my voice saying “Wow!” at the end.)  It was a highlight of a tremendous concert, and makes me sort of wish I’d started on English.  Great work, and, “Wow” encore, M’sieur.

 

David

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Great interpretation - with that "pah-pah" (minus the "oom") pattern and the held notes, you get a very full sound from that concertina.

 

Besides, this video proves once more that the EC, with his thumbs straps, is the most elegantly held instrument in the concertina family. The way you can play it, standing, swinging it around... No anglo or duet player does that, for sure!

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12 hours ago, ritonmousquetaire said:

The way you can play it, standing, swinging it around... No anglo or duet player does that, for sure!

 

 

Edited by John Wild
also check out Tim Laycock on crane duet - I could not find a video clip

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Ok - I won't make such statements again... You found a nice example indeed! Didn't know this video before; a wonderful example of the "bell imitation" effect that I until know hadn't really understood, having only read it from sheet music. Thanks for sharing this!

 

As for Tim Laycock, I found this clip :

 

So, there are indeed anglo and duet players playing their instruments that way. Yet, I'm still under the impression that the thumbs straps allow for more elegance in the way the concertina is held; even in the videos we"ve linked to above, the EC appears to "float" more in comparison... It's difficult to explain why.

Edited by ritonmousquetaire

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