Jump to content
Daniel Hersh

Bach on a bandoneon

Recommended Posts

From a couple of years ago, but I don''t recall seeing it mentioned here:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She’s got a lot to learn about playing Bach. It’s more than just notes. She plays all the right notes, but it’s still a mess. For instance, she plays the very first note short, which is a reasonable choice. Playing it long would also have been a reasonable choice. But there’s got to be consistency. The figure returns frequently in the piece and sometimes she plays it long and sometimes she plays it short, often one right after the other on each hand. There are plenty of other examples that wouldn’t be as easy to point out.

 

I hear a lot of notes. I don’t hear any music.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're a bit harsh David... Though I agree with you on her interpretation, I at least appreciate to hear somebody trying to tackle a difficult repertoire on her instrument - at least she shows that it can be played; I wish we'd see these kind of attempts by concertina players a little bit more.

 

That being said, she probably suffered from the fact that there aren't many bandoneon players trying to tackle Bach's pieces, which means that she hadn't any classicaly trained teacher that could have helped her with her interpretation. Maybe organists could help here...

 

She's not the only one to play Bach on the bandoneon though, Rodolfo Daluisio comes to mind. David, what's your opinion on his interpretation here?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQ7JraKSggo

 

He also plays one my favorite pieces, Rameau's Le Rappel des Oiseaux : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvhtVbzrLws When I got my 20b anglo, it was one of the first pieces I tried to arrange. I did play its first part - though in a heavily butchered version of course. Maybe one day I'll get the ideal concertina, a not too big instrument that'll allow me to play such pieces...

 

Chemnitzer players on the other hand don't seem to be really interested in playing such music on their instruments - I'd be curious to hear them try though.

Edited by ritonmousquetaire
links

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ritonmousquetaire said:

You're a bit harsh David...

 

I was trying to be as gentle as possible, restricting my criticisms to demonstrable truths. For years I’ve been resisting the temptation to say something like this about the playing of some people on this forum, but the culture around here discourages that sort of thing, so I’ve kept it to myself. But in this case the performer is someone we don’t know, so I figured “fair game.” I hope there are members of this forum who will appreciate (and be inspired by) the revelation that playing music is more than playing notes.

 

5 hours ago, ritonmousquetaire said:

That being said, she probably suffered from the fact that there aren't many bandoneon players trying to tackle Bach's pieces, which means that she hadn't any classicaly trained teacher that could have helped her with her interpretation. Maybe organists could help here...

 

The basic tenets of music performance don’t only apply to Bach or classical music. I would think a well-trained bandoneon player, even if they’ve never met an organist or heard a Bach fugue, develops habits that any listener would recognize as “well played.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, ritonmousquetaire said:

She's not the only one to play Bach on the bandoneon though, Rodolfo Daluisio comes to mind. David, what's your opinion on his interpretation here?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQ7JraKSggo

 

He also plays one my favorite pieces, Rameau's Le Rappel des Oiseaux : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvhtVbzrLws

 

Yeah, this guy knows what he’s doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She plays the bandoneon better than I ever plan to, so cheers there. 😃

 

I suspect that her musicianship is adequate to many purposes, but I agree that this is not a flattering style for Bach.

 

I think that's some of the reason I can't stand Glenn Gould's take on the Goldberg Variations that everyone raves about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×