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starting anglo concertina

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im starting 30 button anglo concertina and i dont know where to start.

I haven't bought any books or anything like that. as well as this I get

that this instrument is bisonoric. that being said how do I know

what will work on concertina? is there some sort of rule I an use

to go "ha this will work" on concertina?

 

although I bought it for irish reels i'd like to understand what else

I can do in terms of things with chords eg. oh susanna.

 

thanks!

 

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Posted (edited)

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The Anglo Concertina Demystified by Bertram Levy

Edited by David Barnert

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Hi, If you're mostly interested in playing Irish music on your new Anglo, I'd highly recommend joining the Online Academy of Irish Music and taking the concertina classes. There are several courses taught be 4 different concertina teachers. https://www.oaim.ie/

Have fun!

Susan

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Hi,
As a beginner I can recommend the Gary Coover books. I find them very clear and of progressive difficulty.
 

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Posted (edited)

If you're just doing melody lines, most anything will work on anglo - it's got a pretty wide range. I've yet to encounter a fiddle tune that wouldn't be possible on the concertina, even if I have to get a bit creative with the fingering sometimes.

 

Now chords of course will make things trickier, as you're limited in what notes you can actually play simultaneously - no matter how hard you try, you won't be able to play a C# at the same time as an F. But if you're willing to be creative, you can still manage quite a lot. Maybe you can't play a particular minor chord, but you can play it as an open chord, and that might be good enough. Or maybe you drop the chord briefly while you reverse the bellows to get the note you need for the melody. Or maybe you can get really creative, and throw in a new chord that wasn't there in the original score, but still sounds good. Or if all else fails, transpose the whole piece to a new key, and the chords might become easier.

Edited by Mjolnir

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18 hours ago, Mjolnir said:

If you're just doing melody lines, most anything will work on anglo - it's got a pretty wide range. I've yet to encounter a fiddle tune that wouldn't be possible on the concertina, even if I have to get a bit creative with the fingering sometimes.

 

Now chords of course will make things trickier, as you're limited in what notes you can actually play simultaneously - no matter how hard you try, you won't be able to play a C# at the same time as an F. But if you're willing to be creative, you can still manage quite a lot. Maybe you can't play a particular minor chord, but you can play it as an open chord, and that might be good enough. Or maybe you drop the chord briefly while you reverse the bellows to get the note you need for the melody. Or maybe you can get really creative, and throw in a new chord that wasn't there in the original score, but still sounds good. Or if all else fails, transpose the whole piece to a new key, and the chords might become easier.

well here's the thing some of the songs I'd like to play on anglo are songs like katyusha in dminor and other stuff and so I look into it and immediately start having trouble with it. the melody as you said is easy to figure out but trying to figure out accompaniment is really confusing.

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If you are both new to the Anglo and reading music...as I was and you want to play Irish music, as I did, I would recommend The Concertina Diaries by Heather Greer. It will give you session tunes to play right off, give you the buttons push/draw, the name of the note and show it on the stave lines so you can learn as much as you want. It also comes with a slowed down demo disc of all the tunes in the book, some 47 or so. 

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