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Greensleeves


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I've recently found this version of Greensleeves, one I Like very much.

       Could someone have a look at the pdf and tell me if the B part looks right...........ie should I  keep the same key sig. throughout and place the # signs as I have.

                      And A minor dorian ?

The chords I've indicated are ones I play but any other suggestions welcome.

 Thanks.................Robin

 

Greensleeves & Polly the Lass

      

Greensleeves.pdf

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Hi Robin,

 

as the A section avoids the sixth entirely you could very well change the key signature to one sharp = A Dorian for the entire tune.

 

I can't listen to your recording or play from the sheet at the moment, but re the harmonies I would at least suggest to have C Maj in the first and fifth bar of section B, maybe adjust some more bars, possibly first half of the seventh bar of the B section to A min or F Maj.

 

Hope that makes  sense and I'm not mistaken  just reading everything from the screen.

 

Best wishes - ?

 

 

 

 

Edited by Wolf Molkentin
corrected a faulty count
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adding: bar 7 of section A, start with A-min (or, again, F-maj), bar 3 of section B, replace E-min with A-min.

 

Of course, just suggestions, but I was trying to keep things within your concept, as far as I get it.

 

In my own playing Greensleeves F-maj is rather prominent I guess...

 

Best wishes - ?

 

 

Edited by Wolf Molkentin
typos
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There’s a classic 16th c Italian renaissance progression called the passamezzo antico that fits the A section: Am–|G–|Am–|E–|C–|G–|AmE|Am–||. For the B section, I would use the “romanesca” variant (see both linked wikipedia articles) replacing the first Am with a C.

 

[Edited to change the two Em chords to E]

Edited by David Barnert
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 I seem to hear Amin as suggested in the seventh bar

I know what you mean ,Wolf, but to my ears, the C-> Em-> Am-> is more interesting ? Small difference really, I think.

      I also play melodeon and if you are not careful you can end up playing the same chord over and over so I strain to change it up on that instrument and I bring that approach to the anglo.

 

 

There’s a classic 16th c Italian renaissance progression called the passamezzo antico that fits the A section: Am–|G–|Am–|E–|C–|G–|AmE|Am–||. For the B section, I would use the “romanesca” variant (see both linked wikipedia articles) replacing the first Am with a C.

Interesting articles, Dave. I do like the suggestion of changing the E minor's to E major in the first section. As it turns out, that is what I do anyway.

     I often play two note chords on the bass side which tends to be a neutral chord but very effective on the anglo when tapping/punching out chords without the beat note.

But we agree on A dorian, with an F# in the key signature ?

Thanks both.

Robin

Greensleeves.nwc

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2 hours ago, Robin Harrison said:

I know what you mean ,Wolf, but to my ears, the C-> Em-> Am-> is more interesting ? Small difference really, I think.

 

You‘re just talking about the first inversion of an A minor chord, which in fact could be heard as Cmaj6 but definitely so only when there‘s a G note around too, or if the context would be suggesting so.

 

I myself am rather thinking in terms of harmony than chords, so for me it‘s just Amin...

 

Best wishes - ?

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On 6/27/2018 at 11:05 AM, Robin Harrison said:

Interesting articles, Dave. I do like the suggestion of changing the E minor's to E major in the first section. As it turns out, that is what I do anyway.

 

Just make sure that the right hand and left hand agree: if you’re using an E chord, the melody needs a G#. The reason I changed my previous post was because it occurred to me that Greensleeves can be played convincingly either way.

 

Quote

But we agree on A dorian, with an F# in the key signature ?

 

Yes.

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  • 2 years later...

Gregor's version is the waltz-like song version. The jig version Robin is interested in seems to be more commonly known as The Wyresdale Greensleeves. Putting that into Google will bring up several examples (including RVW's original manuscript). There are several variants of the melody. Most have the leading note natural rather than sharpened. The three-man dance is entertaining.

 

As for the accompaniment, I'd say go for whatever you like the sound of. Following loosely from pikeyh's version on YouTube (it comes up in the Google search) I'm quite happy to use both Fmaj and Dmaj in the A music.

 

This is how I played it the day I learnt it. I play both the melody and the harmony slightly differently now.

 

LJ

Edited by Little John
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Robin - nice playing, as always.

 

Recently I found this version of Greensleeves on Andy Turner's blog - a quick and dirty recording on a Jeffries 30 button GD. Andy  says the tune  was found in the1798 manuscript of North Yorkshire miller Joshua Jackson. 

 

Isn't it interesting how many tunes share the name?

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