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John, I‘m aware of the decoration you‘re referring to (and am taking the liberty to use it for my folk repertoire as well at times) but will listen to Tannhäuser once again upon this occasion...

 

As to the simple trill (note - one diatonic step upward - note) here‘s a link to my folksy reference (as adopted for my own playing). I didn‘t manage to play the decoration as intended every time, but at second 50 there‘s a good example of what I‘ve been talking about.

 

Best wishes - 🐺

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On 6/16/2018 at 10:17 PM, Wolf Molkentin said:

Thank you Mike, good to listen to your rather strict playing (which I always admire for its steadiness and ease). A lot to consider (at least for variation), and I like the 8-7-6-5 bass run at the beginning of the B section...

 

That said I like to add that I greatly appreciate your replying musically - I guess this is what always could be done post-TOTM. I on my part am explicitly inviting anyone to add a recording of his or her own playing the tunes, or one of them.

 

Best wishes - 🐺

Hi

This was  a first take, no edits, just to contrast with Mike's playing.

 

Graham

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Hi Graham,

 

I realy like your rendition, the double stops above the melody, overlapping notes and bass runs - in total it has an intenseness which I always find a nice option for the concertina, letting it to some extent sound like a fiddle, or even a couple of them. First time I‘m hearing such a thing played by an Anglo concertinist...

 

Will consider elements of this version for my own playing...

 

Best wishes - 🐺

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Graham, I had to research my own previous posts to find my name for the musical quality I'm often aiming at and am hearing in your playing now, related to "intense": it was (and still is) interwoven. What do you say?

 

Best wishes - 🐺

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Thank you, for positive comments. Video is to explain how my anglo style originated.

 

C/G anglo, lent by friend, 41 years ago, who then had it back, replaced with english. After 4-5 years a small inheritance made it possible to buy G/D Jeffries       (not the best) but I had to part exchange the english. Over many years my anglo playing has become what it has, with a lack of knowledge and application to play a chordal bass style, but hoping to make a pleasant noise.

 

https://youtu.be/jbrYfie5rOA

 

I played Munster Cloak with no fore thought, so you will see why I play mainly anglo.

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interesting - this is why I‘d been reminded of hearing an English - however you seem to make it work much better on the Anglo

 

is the model 22 still in your possession and getting played regularly?

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Your concertina has a wonderful warm sound.  So, that's your Wheatstone ME Aeola TT?

Do you mind explaining to me what the designation tenor-treble means?

 

 

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Glad you like it (as I do myself) - yes, its the ME Aeola TT.

 

Tenor treble is indicating a treble (the ordinary 48 button instrument) extended (possibly upwards as well, but at least) down to the C below "middle C", thereby retaining the fingering of the treble, so that you can easily alternate between the two instruments, just adding some "bass" notes with the TT.

 

Best wishes - 🐺

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