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Wheatstone 56 Key Aeola Amboyna Concertina Unbelievable Condition

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For sale is this amazing condition Wheatstone Aeola .

Its a 56 key with gilt fittings, steel reeds, 5 fold bellows with not a crack no crazing nothing missing just like it left wheatstone yesterday.

Serial number is 25225 ( 1911 ) its a model 18. Its measures 6 1/2 inches across the raised ends The reeds are like new and it sounds great.

There is a stamp on the inside M. Martin 245 William St, Perth , WA.

One of the reed pans is pencilled 522 would indicate that it was originally( or later ) tuned to New Philharmonic Pitch and its very much in tuner with my guitar tuner.

A few keys are a little stickey from lack of playing but that easy fixed up.

Comes with original Wheatstone brown case with needs some attention even has the original key.

The best condition concertina i have had or seen in over 20 years just beautiful.

Open to a good offer and if it sells here i will make the usual donation to concertina net.

I will ship world wide at you expense

Good luckpost-2119-0-34124600-1523419323_thumb.jpgpost-2119-0-84614200-1523419448_thumb.jpgpost-2119-0-63337600-1523419497_thumb.jpgpost-2119-0-39104800-1523419576_thumb.jpgpost-2119-0-42196600-1523419628_thumb.jpgpost-2119-0-13348000-1523419674_thumb.jpg

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One of the reed pans is pencilled 522 would indicate that it was originally( or later ) tuned to New Philharmonic Pitch and its very much in tuner with my guitar tuner.

 

Forgive me... I’m not familiar with that notation. What does “522” have to do with New Philharmonic Pitch, which is A=439? Can your guitar tuner resolve the difference between 439 and 440?

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One of the reed pans is pencilled 522 would indicate that it was originally( or later ) tuned to New Philharmonic Pitch and its very much in tuner with my guitar tuner.

Forgive me... I’m not familiar with that notation. What does “522” have to do with New Philharmonic Pitch, which is A=439? Can your guitar tuner resolve the difference between 439 and 440?

 

New Philharmonic Pitch C=522Hz.I think there's about a 4 cent difference between A=439 and A=440.

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It is not uncommon, especially in older literature, to find a C reference pitch rather than the A which is commonly used today.

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Posted (edited)

One of the reed pans is pencilled 522 would indicate that it was originally( or later ) tuned to New Philharmonic Pitch and its very much in tuner with my guitar tuner.

Forgive me... I’m not familiar with that notation. What does “522” have to do with New Philharmonic Pitch, which is A=439? Can your guitar tuner resolve the difference between 439 and 440?

New Philharmonic Pitch C=522Hz.I think there's about a 4 cent difference between A=439 and A=440.

It is not uncommon, especially in older literature, to find a C reference pitch rather than the A which is commonly used today.

 

Thanks. All of this makes sense now. A 439 x (1.059463)^3 [three equal-tempered half steps] = C 522.

 

Edited to add:

 

The 4 cents works, too. (440/439)^25 is about 1.061, close enough to a half step (4 cents being 1/25 of a half step).

Edited by David Barnert

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Posted (edited)

Might the ends be replacements? The badges?

 

I'd not go so far as to say the ends might be replacements , but those badges do appear to be 1950's era....... ??

Edited by Geoff Wooff

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Yes, wondering from the badges if this concertina has post/lever rather than riveted action?

Indeed !

 

It is the classic " buying a pig in a poke" without either personal examination or photos of the insides of the action boxes.

 

The reedpans look correct for 1911 as does the quality of the fretwork, but a squint under the lids would be helpful Patrick... with views of the keywork and undersides of the ends .

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On 4/14/2018 at 1:14 PM, David Barnert said:

 

The 4 cents works, too. (440/439)^25 is about 1.061

 

isn't it rather 1,0585317918216582297118711368439 - even closer then? 😎

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16 hours ago, Wolf Molkentin said:

isn't it rather 1,0585317918216582297118711368439 - even closer then? 😎

 

Indeed. I don’t remember how I calculated the 1.061, but recalculating it now, I get the same result you did.

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Abt possibility of a video?

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