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Little John

Old Mrs Wilson

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I love this tune. It starts resolutely in D major for the A music. The B music goes into D mixolydian thought there's no hint for the first two bars. Then bars 3 and 4 hit you with three C naturals to hammer the point home. No more Cs (either sharp or natural) occur in the B part but I confess I introduce a C# in the accompaniment towards the end. I did try a C natural to be consistent but it didn't sound quite ... natural!

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Posted (edited)

Nice! It starts and ends a lot like Young Collins, but the middle part is quite different. Very dynamic and driving rendition.

 

I like the bass work ("as usual" <_< )!

Edited by RAc

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Nice tune - I found a score on t'internet and ABC'd it. Thank you.

 

Nice! It starts and ends a lot like Young Collins, but the middle part is quite different.

 

Does it make 'sense' that the two tunes are played as a set? I tried this by concatenating ABC scripts for the two tunes and it sounds OK(-ish).

 

'Old Mrs Wilson' starts in D and ends in Dmix (which is scored with one sharp), and the 'Young Collins' I have is also scored with one sharp (ie: G).

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Posted (edited)

 

Does it make 'sense' that the two tunes are played as a set? I tried this by concatenating ABC scripts for the two tunes and it sounds OK(-ish).

 

It could work, but they might be a bit too similar. It's always interesting looking for suitable pairings - similar enough to complement each other but different enough to provide some contrast.

 

I use Young Collins to follow Sheriff's Ride (Raggle Taggle Gypsies) on the tenuous grounds that the latter starts with a five-note downward scale (E minor) while the former starts with an five-note upward scale (G major).

 

Old Mrs Wilson follows The Rochdale Coconut Dance in my pairing. They start with vaguely similar tunes confined to the first five notes of their respective scales. The Rochdale Coconut Dance is in Em and the tune goes no higher than D. Old Mrs Wilson starts one note lower (D major) but then after three bars breaks free of its confines soaring to E, then F# and finally G; which I feel gives the whole set a lift.

Edited by Little John

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