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Geoffrey Crabb

Wheatstone Oval Label

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Some discussion about the Oval badges used by Wheatstone has been made in an item in the Buy & Sell forum. To avoid detracting from the main purpose of the OP, I have added below an image of such a label which, although worn, still shows the actual wording that was used.

 

post-110-0-57907600-1519146053_thumb.jpg

 

C Wheatstone & Co

Inventors

Patentees & Manufacts

London

 

Blank ovals (brass or nickel silver) were impressed from the front such that the wording and edge (rim) were left slightly raised. The background was sometimes 'blacked'.

 

Geoffrey

 

 

 

 

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Thanks Geoff. It reminds me of those novelty machines at tourist attractions that roll a commemorative design onto a coin, elongating it into an oval shape in the process.

 

 

In fact the process is termed 'Coining'

 

Geoffrey

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Funny. I thought, from Steve Tilston's song "King of the Coiners", that "coining it" was the process of shaving small slivers of metal off the edge of gold and silver coins. In effect, stealing from the treasury, and the reason for the introduction of milling on the edges of coins.

Edited by Little John

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Just to say, it's useful information, as I have a label exactly like that shown on my baritone. Difficult to photograph, as being brass it wears to easily.

 

Les Branchett

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Funny. I thought, from Steve Tilston's song "King of the Coiners", that "coining it" was the process of shaving small slivers of metal off the edge of gold and silver coins. In effect, stealing from the treasury, and the reason for the introduction of milling on the edges of coins.

 

Many words have multiple meanings, with context often indicating which meaning is intended.

 

E.g., watering a garden vs. watering beer.

Maybe a better example would be a "tin ear" vs. a "tin whistle".

Edited by JimLucas

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