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slatteryj

Lachenal Anglo For Sale

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Lovely 30 Key Lachenal Anglo Concertina (Excelsior model) Ornate Rosewood ends, 6 fold bellows, C/G, steel reeds, bone buttons, lightweight and sounds great, played regularly, selling to fund purchase of a Wheatstone. Price is £1100 plus shipping - I am based in the UK

Edited by slatteryj

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What do you mean by "concert pitch"? To an orchestral musician the term refers to a non-transposing instrument (ie., the oboe plays at concert pitch, the Bb clarinet plays a whole tone lower than concert pitch). I've never heard of a concertina that didn't play at concert pitch in this sense.

 

If you mean A=440 and/or equal temperament, these are different from concert pitch. There are certainly concertinas tuned to standards other than A-440 and other temperaments.

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What do you mean by "concert pitch"? To an orchestral musician the term refers to a non-transposing instrument ...

If you mean A=440 and/or equal temperament, these are different from concert pitch.

I agree that those would be helpful clarifications, and I did not know that concert pitch means non-transposing.

 

I've always thought that "concert pitch" is synonymous with A=440. Indeed, the American Heritage Dictionary, among other sources, defines "concert pitch" as equivalent to "international pitch," which is defined as A=400. See here. Perhaps this is one of those cases where popular usage overtakes the correct definition?

 

... Which reminds me of the hubbub a few years ago on rec.music.makers.squeezebox when it was reported that the revision of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians would list the concertina as a member of the "accordion family." Anybody know if that really happened, or if it was corrected in editing?

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I've never heard of a concertina that didn't play at concert pitch in this sense.

 

Yes, you have. :) An anglo in Bb/F would be a Bb anglo in that sense, and I would even contend that a G/D is "an anglo in G", etc.

 

There has been at least one Crane duet in Bb on eBay recently, though you may not have noticed. And do you know Mark Gilston? He had (has?) an English in A.

 

If you mean A=440 and/or equal temperament, these are different from concert pitch.

 

Funny you should say that, because to me *that* has always been a standard meaning of the term.

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What do you mean by "concert pitch"? To an orchestral musician the term refers to a non-transposing instrument (ie., the oboe plays at concert pitch, the Bb clarinet plays a whole tone lower than concert pitch). I've never heard of a concertina that didn't play at concert pitch in this sense.

 

If you mean A=440 and/or equal temperament, these are different from concert pitch. There are certainly concertinas tuned to standards other than A-440 and other temperaments.

:D The concertina is C/G

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If you mean A=440 and/or equal temperament, these are different from concert pitch.

 

Funny you should say that, because to me *that* has always been a standard meaning of the term.

Thats always been my understanding as well.

 

Clive

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I've never heard of a concertina that didn't play at concert pitch in this sense.

 

Yes, you have. :) An anglo in Bb/F would be a Bb anglo in that sense, and I would even contend that a G/D is "an anglo in G", etc.

Well, no, not unless the musician calls the Bb a C and plays Bb when he sees a C in the music.

If you mean A=440 and/or equal temperament, these are different from concert pitch.

 

Funny you should say that, because to me *that* has always been a standard meaning of the term.

 

I now see, from this page and all over the web elsewhere that there is not much agreement with my take on "concert pitch." Thank you all. I still swear I've heard it used among classical musicians all my life to mean what I thought it meant.

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I've never heard of a concertina that didn't play at concert pitch in this sense.

 

Yes, you have. :) An anglo in Bb/F would be a Bb anglo in that sense, and I would even contend that a G/D is "an anglo in G", etc.

Well, no, not unless the musician calls the Bb a C and plays Bb when he sees a C in the music.

Two takes on that:

..1) I believe that's exactly what they did in the old concertina marching bands, playing from music written for Bb trumpet or clarinet.

..2) But many concertina players don't read music. They play by ear. If *that* precludes classifying their Bb/F instruments as "Bb" in the orchestral sense, then the same should be true of the instruments of by-ear clarinet and trumpet players.

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I now see, from this page and all over the web elsewhere that there is not much agreement with my take on "concert pitch." Thank you all. I still swear I've heard it used among classical musicians all my life to mean what I thought it meant.

Wouldn't be the first expression to have more than one common meaning. I think your memory's OK.

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