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Mike Pierceall

In Trutina - Carl Orff 1935

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Mike, this is a truly beautiful transformation of a piece that probably many of us (like myself) are familiar with and affected by. The diminished chords sound great, the rubato keeps the whole thing interesting, and the fragile melody comes, mostly, through.

 

However, if you don't mind me, there's still something distracting with the recording, prompting me to give it a looped listen to really discover the beauty in it. I guess it comes from some harsh moments which may be forced by lack of sufficient air supply and subsequent bellows reversal - I'm not sure here.

 

Don't get me wrong: I'm not advocating for everything to be kept completely calm and tender - but the take may deserve slightly more balance re timing, volume, attack. I'm aware of how hard these final improvements are achieved but hope you can use a hint, combined with appreciation.

 

So good that you're keeping up the performing business here (it's all about the music, isn't it?), which I'm inclined to rejoin in the near future myself as well (and I simply love your reed organ videos too!).

 

Best wishes - Wolf

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Mike, this is a truly beautiful transformation of a piece that probably many of us (like myself) are familiar with and affected by. The diminished chords sound great, the rubato keeps the whole thing interesting, and the fragile melody comes, mostly, through.

 

However, if you don't mind me, there's still something distracting with the recording, prompting me to give it a looped listen to really discover the beauty in it. I guess it comes from some harsh moments which may be forced by lack of sufficient air supply and subsequent bellows reversal - I'm not sure here.

 

Don't get me wrong: I'm not advocating for everything to be kept completely calm and tender - but the take may deserve slightly more balance re timing, volume, attack. I'm aware of how hard these final improvements are achieved but hope you can use a hint, combined with appreciation.

 

So good that you're keeping up the performing business here (it's all about the music, isn't it?), which I'm inclined to rejoin in the near future myself as well (and I simply love your reed organ videos too!).

 

Best wishes - Wolf

HI, Wolf. Feedback appreciated. I went back and forth between my Aeola, which has a mellower tone but is less responsive and the 5A, which has a hair-trigger response, but can be difficult to throttle back. In the end I used the 5A because the bellows I made for it can supply the air to carry out those long phrases. The arrangement itself went through perhaps 25 drafts. I'm still making changes! It might be fascinating (or not) to make a video that gives some insight into the arranging process. At any rate, I'll continue to fine tune the execution, and thanks for your observations.

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The arrangement itself went through perhaps 25 drafts. I'm still making changes! It might be fascinating (or not) to make a video that gives some insight into the arranging process

I for one would of course love to watch this kind of video to have a closer look on your personal approach to dealing with the limitations of our wonderful little boxes...

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and as to the instrument chosen:

 

...and the 5A, which has a hair-trigger response, but can be difficult to throttle back. In the end I used the 5A because the bellows I made for it can supply the air to carry out those long phrases.

I reckon I know what you're talking about as I'm acquainting myself with a terrific Model 24 from 1920 with similar characteristics (including a comfortable 7-folds-bellows) at the moment (though I have no Aeola at hand for comparison).

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