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Don Taylor

New, Lower Priced Mid-Range Anglo From Concetina Connection?

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Wim:

 

I am being impatient, I know, but what will be the button count and layout on the Troubadour Hayden?

 

Thx. Don.

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Hi Wim,

 

I am a bit foxed by your terminology:

 

CT Tension?

 

Bellows 'waist'?

 

thanks

 

Dave

 

The CT referred to ‘Closed Tension’, which was explained earlier in the article I copied the text from.

 

CT stands for Closed Tension, as opposed to OT Open Tension. Bellows tension is one of the subjects measured in a bellows evaluation and was explained earlier in the article (bellows tension (in grams), bellows travel (in percentage), stability (in pressure) and airtightness (airflow per minute)).

 

“Bellows waist” is the difference in circumference between the bellows frames and the bellows.

 

hope it makes more sense now...

 

 

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Wim:

 

I am being impatient, I know, but what will be the button count and layout on the Troubadour Hayden?

 

Thx. Don.

Actually, I developed 2 models, one in a 6 1/4“ housing and one larger… We’re not sure which one will go in production. The smaller one is cheaper (Busker price), the larger one has more buttons but is therefore more expensive.

 

Our primary objective for this model line is a low cost model, which is a big step up from the entry level models in playability, quality and sound.

A larger instrument will probably be out of financial reach again for many players, especially for customers outside the US when you have to add 21% or more sales tax, import, shipping, etc..

 

We’re still working on it. Because this model line is modular in design, we only need about 4 weeks from final design to production.

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Wim:

 

Thanks, I can see the dilemma, which is why I asked the question

 

I guess the larger model button layout would be close to the Peacock (42 buttons and all accidentals) and the smaller model to an Elise (34 buttons with some missing accidentals).

 

As the owner of a Peacock, I would say go for the small case and fewer keys. Others will probably disagree, but the size and price point are attractive - I would like a small instrument even if it is limited to a few 'folky' keys.

 

Don.

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Wim:

 

As the owner of a Peacock, I would say go for the small case and fewer keys. Others will probably disagree, but the size and price point are attractive - I would like a small instrument even if it is limited to a few 'folky' keys.

 

Don.

I agree. The main addition i would like is a mirrored left hand option, but that's proably not in the cards for keeping the price down.

 

ron

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Hi Wim,

 

I am a bit foxed by your terminology:

 

CT Tension?

 

Bellows 'waist'?

 

thanks

 

Dave

 

The CT referred to ‘Closed Tension’, which was explained earlier in the article I copied the text from.

 

CT stands for Closed Tension, as opposed to OT Open Tension. Bellows tension is one of the subjects measured in a bellows evaluation and was explained earlier in the article (bellows tension (in grams), bellows travel (in percentage), stability (in pressure) and airtightness (airflow per minute)).

 

“Bellows waist” is the difference in circumference between the bellows frames and the bellows.

 

hope it makes more sense now...

 

 

 

 

Wim,

 

I tried to find your article on the web to answer my questions, but failed. Can you advise how I can access it. I did look before I asked my questions otherwise I would not have had the need to show my ignorance.

 

Dave

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Wim:

 

As the owner of a Peacock, I would say go for the small case and fewer keys. Others will probably disagree, but the size and price point are attractive - I would like a small instrument even if it is limited to a few 'folky' keys.

 

Don.

I agree. The main addition i would like is a mirrored left hand option, but that's proably not in the cards for keeping the price down.

 

ron

 

 

Actually, all our duet models (Peacock, future Troubadour, and the Wakker duets) are available with a mirrored left side. We don't charge extra for that.

 

Mirrored duets make more sense to free bass accordion players who switch to duet concertina. Bayans also come with both variations for the left hand; the Russian system (bottom low/top high) and the western system (top low/bottom high).

 

 

 

 

Hi Wim,

 

I am a bit foxed by your terminology:

 

CT Tension?

 

Bellows 'waist'?

 

thanks

 

Dave

 

The CT referred to ‘Closed Tension’, which was explained earlier in the article I copied the text from.

 

CT stands for Closed Tension, as opposed to OT Open Tension. Bellows tension is one of the subjects measured in a bellows evaluation and was explained earlier in the article (bellows tension (in grams), bellows travel (in percentage), stability (in pressure) and airtightness (airflow per minute)).

 

“Bellows waist” is the difference in circumference between the bellows frames and the bellows.

 

hope it makes more sense now...

 

 

 

 

Wim,

 

I tried to find your article on the web to answer my questions, but failed. Can you advise how I can access it. I did look before I asked my questions otherwise I would not have had the need to show my ignorance.

 

Dave

 

 

 

We don't have them on our site yet... I am still editing/organizing them...I have 4 of them finished, out of 10-15. The material comes from articles I wrote for free reed magazines (European), lectures and workshops.

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As far as bellows are concerned, another factor is the depth of the bellows folds. Shallower bellows have to open wider and thus at a greater angle to get the same amount of expansion as a bellows with deeper folds. This is just as important as any other factor in bellows construction. A six fold bellows with 3/4 inch depth will not open as far or as easily as a bellows with 1 1/4 inch depth folds. A little makes a big difference.

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After watching from the sidelines for a couple of years, in no small part due to uncertainty about what instrument to purchase, I finally ordered a new Rochelle from Smythe’s Accordion Center in Oakland CA. I went today to pick up my new concertina, but made a terrible mistake before finalizing my purchase: I asked to look at a Minstrel in the display case which I was told had recently arrived in the shop. So of course I bought the Minstrel. It is quite lovely, with a much more refined tone than the Rochelle. As a rank beginner I can't offer a sophisticated comparison of the two models. But I believe that the Minstrel is an instrument that could satisfy a serious student for years to come, perhaps for a lifetime. I am lucky enough to have the means to afford it, though I swallowed hard as it’s a large sum of money to spend on an instrument I only hope someday to play competently.

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I am lucky enough to have the means to afford it, though I swallowed hard as it’s a large sum of money to spend on an instrument I only hope someday to play competently.

 

A consistent theme in this forum (and borne out by my own experience) is that you are wise to buy the best instrument you can afford, even if just starting out. Maybe, especially if just starting out. I think you made a wise move, one that will save you money and speed your development on the concertina.

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ukmanohnz

I bet you won't regret your decision to plump for the Minstrel. I am definitely a long way from being a natural musician. In fact, I struggle with it much more than anyone else I know of who has learnt to play. Experience has taught me that I have to have a reasonable instrument to have any chance at all. Less expensive models prove just too difficult to play, which just adds to the frustration and so on.

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Absolutely no regrets. I spent the afternoon yesterday working the first few lessons in the tutorial book that is provided with the Rochelle (which the store graciously included with my purchase of the Minstrel). I am smitten, but it’s such a different experience to playing a fretted stringed instrument. I’m determined to succeed. Still trying to come to grips with the first few notes - I have variously played guitar, mandolin and bass guitar for four decades and more. On these instruments it matters not if I strum upward or downward on a given string - the same note ensues. Not so this mischievous little delight.

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As someone who was caught far too long in the financial stretch between a Rochelle/Wren and a Ceili/Clover/vintage box, these quality mid-range boxes are a delight to see.

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Appreciate the informative discussion. I love my Rochelle, have had it a year and play it every day, and am very satisfied. If I get good enough, however (maybe another year?), I might be interested in this new model.

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Edvsicek, glad you love your Rochelle. I currently play one too. But having played more advanced concertinas, I can tell you that you will advance faster on a better instrument. On another forum, the prevailing thought is to play the best instrument you can afford. I think that’s sage advice on any musical instrument. Just my $.02.

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