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Computer Generated Irish Traditional Music?


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Here's a more technical article on the same project, from two years ago. I imagine improvements have continued to make this better ... but is there a limit? Will we always be able to tell? Or will we just insist that we're able to tell (even if experimental evidence suggests otherwise)?... :unsure:

 

And the tunes can be named by Janelle Shane's recent neural network for naming Irish tunes :lol:

Edited by wayman
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That's what this article says (please ignore the melodica playing the concertina part).

 

https://www.irishtimes.com/business/technology/computer-program-created-to-write-irish-trad-tunes-1.3112238

 

 

That's fun! Okay, let's be honest, how many of us can chose the correct tune? (Needless to say, I failed miserably...)

It reminds me of Mozart's famous Musikalisches Würfelspiel:

 

http://imslp.org/wiki/Musikalisches_W%C3%BCrfelspiel,_K.516f_(Mozart,_Wolfgang_Amadeus)

 

Adrian

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That's what this article says (please ignore the melodica playing the concertina part).

 

https://www.irishtimes.com/business/technology/computer-program-created-to-write-irish-trad-tunes-1.3112238

 

Hey, if various individuals think a couple of my own tunes are "Irish", then why not the same for computer-generated tunes?

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Okay, let's be honest, how many of us can chose the correct tune? (Needless to say, I failed miserably...)

Well, I got it, but I was already familiar with the first two tunes. :)

 

Still, I like to think I would have gotten it right, anyway. I feel there's something subtly -- very subtly -- "off" about the third one. If I find time, I might try to analyze it to figure out what it is... but don't hold your breath. (I thought about doing that today instead of some more urgent tasks, but then I realized that such procrastination could wait at least until tomorrow.)

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Well, all those jigs sound the same to me, anyway - whether trad., composed by a person or artificially generated.

 

In the three clips, the tunes were played by human musicians who were obviously accustomed to playing jigs, so the sound is very characteristic of the genre. Irish dance tunes aren't "composer's music" anyway - they're "players' music." To me, a newly composed or "generated" jig played by Irish trad. musicians would sound more Irish than a trad. jig played from a score by classical musicians with no experience of the genre.

 

Cheers,

John

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Looking at the (smallish) selection of toon books on my shelf, I wonder

what this beast would produce if fed on a diet of tunes from:

 

Playford

A Song for Every Season

Shanties from the Seven Seas

Country Blues Song Book

Civil War Concertina ( :))

Penguin Book of English Folk Songs

Penguin Book of American Folk Songs

 

I wonder how it would cope with a selection of Scott Joplins tunes and

other ragtime tunes?

 

Fascinating stuff, but I couldn't see a download for the program - pity.

 

It seems to use highly sanitised ABC as input, but I couldn't see the

'clean-up' rules anywhere (it certainly seems to lose the opening

X: field?).

Edited by lachenal74693
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That's what this article says (please ignore the melodica playing the concertina part).

 

https://www.irishtimes.com/business/technology/computer-program-created-to-write-irish-trad-tunes-1.3112238

 

Hey, if various individuals think a couple of my own tunes are "Irish", then why not the same for computer-generated tunes?

 

 

I think with Irish music being currently the most 'mediarised' of vernacular genres, anything played on acoustic instruments is often assumed to be "Irish"or "Celtic" by the great unwashed...

 

Adrian

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I think with Irish music being currently the most 'mediarised' of vernacular genres, anything played on acoustic instruments is often assumed to be "Irish"or "Celtic" by the great unwashed...

And I bathe regularly, so that's why I was able to tell the difference? :unsure:

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I think with Irish music being currently the most 'mediarised' of vernacular genres, anything played on acoustic instruments is often assumed to be "Irish"or "Celtic" by the great unwashed...

And I bathe regularly, so that's why I was able to tell the difference? :unsure:

 

 

I'll give it a go Jim and see if it makes any difference to me :lol:

 

Adrian

Edited by adrian brown
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Not a new thing. I think there are references in passing to this in my 1977 dissertation, though that work dealt with non compositional use of the computer. I know that a couple of college kids did a similar thing creating "Bach" chorales using the probability information in one of the standard harmony books, because I helped with it. Still, an interesting project, and one that I hope continues to develop. Can the program, in the future, produce Scottish or Cape Breton tunes distinguishable from Irish?

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Not a new thing....

 

It can be done with literature too:

 

"Gleaming harnesses, petticoats on slim ass rain. Had to adore. Gleaming silks, spicy fruits, pettled

Perfume all. Had to go back. Had to back. Had to back. His braces all him ass to adore. Gleaming

harness rain yielded. A warm silver, rays of the mutely craved dorn on slim ass rays of the woman

plumpnesses. Uselesh obscurely, he mutely craved down on him assailed. A warm hungered down..."

 

an example of 'faux' James Joyce generated using a 75 word sample from 'Ulysses''. The actual

computational algorithm(s) and methods are different, but the result is claimed to be disturbingly

similar to genuine Joyce.

 

Source: 'Travesty', Hugh Kenner & Joseph O'Rourke, Byte Magazine, November 1984.

 

The paper contains a listing of a Pascal program to do this stuff. I suppose a determined individual

(not me!) could adapt it to read ABC and generate their own music?

 

Other sources:

 

'Travesty Revisited', Murray Lesser, Byte Magazine, July 1985.

'Build a Travesty Tree', Peter Wayner, Byte Magazine, September 1985.

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