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Any Idea What Mozart Song This Is? Concertina Book By Frank Converse

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the book is called: Deluxe Concertina Book by Frank J. Converse, Mel bay.

 

the song is called concertina concerto, its on page 50, if you have the book.

 

from what i understand, mozart made alot of concertos. I just want to get an idea of what the song sounds like on youtube. (before remapping it out and learning it.)

 

 

I can post a picture of the piece, but I don't know how copy right laws and fair usage laws work.

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Mozart wrote very few songs, none of them are also concertos, and even his smallest concertos won't fit on two pages. Converse has done a bit of tacky renaming along the lines of "Lovers' Concerto" and "Symphonies for the Sixties".

 

The melodies of Mozart's music are certainly not copyright anywhere. Just scan or photograph the main theme and upload it.

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Mozart wrote very few songs, none of them are also concertos...

 

I suspect he’s using the word “song” in the general sense of any musical selection.

 

[Edited to add:] Oh, and Mozart wrote many songs. His operas are full of them. He called (and we still call) them “arias."

Edited by David Barnert

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Mozart called songs "lieder" and knew what the difference was between that form and an operatic aria.

 

"Das Veilchen" is probably the best known, but this was one field where Haydn far outperformed him. Mozart's entire song output fits on two CDs, Naxos 8.557900-01, with 36 tracks.

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Aria is Italian, Lied is German. They both mean song. Mozart spoke German and wrote (most of his) operas in Italian, so he used them both.

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They are DIFFERENT GENRES. Not only did Mozart use different languages for each, the forms are different and so is the instrumentation.

 

The Italian equivalent of German "lied" is "canto", not "aria".

 

Anyway - can the OP not simply take a photo of a distinctive phrase from the music and upload it? (If the original was a concerto, my bet is that it will turn out to be the famous 6/8 finale from the horn concerto no.4, since that should transfer to the concertina reasonably well).

Edited by Jack Campin

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Looks like the OP is a hit-and-run troll and won't be back with any more information.

 

I'm still curious. Anybody else got the book and can post enough of the relevant theme to be recognizable?

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Mozart wrote very few songs, none of them are also concertos, and even his smallest concertos won't fit on two pages. Converse has done a bit of tacky renaming along the lines of "Lovers' Concerto" and "Symphonies for the Sixties".

 

 

The point you made, about the stupid renaming of songs, has completely turned me off to this book. I'm not going to learn tunes that don't have the accurate name of a song.

 

If you still want it, ill post it. It doesn't violate any copyright laws by posting stuff for educational purposes. And learning the name of a song is quite educational. its actually kinda short anyway

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As far as naming, you're not going to find a Mozart concerto on one page of a Mel Bay book. They tend to be dozens of minutes long and involve a solo instrument and a full orchestra, each instrument with its own music, filling the pages of a book an inch thick. And as for a Concertina Concerto, just remember that Mozart was dead nearly 40 years before the concertina was invented. It's probably a tune from a well-known piano or violin concerto, arranged for concertina.

 

But now you've got me curious. Sure, if it's not to difficult, I'd like to see what's there.

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I have the book right here and it is a solo piano work of Mozart my sister played as a young piano student, but that's not my genre and the name escapes me (if I ever knew it).

 

OT, but when my wife wanted to start anglo, the BB folks (either Rich Morse or Doug Creighton) suggested this book by Converse. It worked well for her as someone who had done almost no music before - I think it is underrated. It gave her a good start on a number of ways to finger two rows, doing a different line on each hand at the same time, when to grab air, etc. I'm not sure she ever tackled the Mozart, however.

 

Ken

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No, no, let me attempt some abc from memory (I'm now at work, away from the book):

 

X: 1

M: C

L: 1/8

K: C

c4 e2 g2 | B3 c/d/ c4 | a4 g2 c'2 | g2 g/f/e/f/ e4 |

 

You know, that one!

Ken

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I think Converse is just having fun with titles and trying to make the student feel accomplished (it is the last pages in his book). I'm sure reactions will vary (as we have seen); some find this incorrect according to accepted definitions, while others (me) find it more or less harmless. Off to try playing it (check back with me in six months).

 

Ken

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No, no, let me attempt some abc from memory (I'm now at work, away from the book):

 

X: 1

M: C

L: 1/8

K: C

c4 e2 g2 | B3 c/d/ c4 | a4 g2 c'2 | g2 g/f/e/f/ e4 |

 

You know, that one!

Ken

This one had been my guess anyway whilst reading this thread I just stumbled upon, Ken - loved to play this first movement as a child back then, my first "major" work...

 

However, it's not that obviously to be taken up with a concertina, whichever system, soundwise; does the book just give the, um, melody? 🙃 The dots following your short sketch would at least make for a nice "étude"...

 

Best wishes - Wolf

Edited by Wolf Molkentin

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